magic lantern 5d mark iii

magic lantern 5d mark iii

Magic lantern 5d mark iii

7a3b5fa: Ghost image: further cleanups and fixes

4702ca0: Ghost image: fix crash (issues #2796, #2783, #2878, #2885)

94442d9: features.tmpl edited online with Bitbucket: use id in th section heading to allow for direct linking via anchor

5e40987: Merged in edmac (pull request #886)
EDMAC module: fixes for DIGIC 4, connection map

b54a0c6: Merged in adv_int (pull request #907)
Advanced intervalometer updates

58e11ee: Merged in memory-backend (pull request #906)
Memory backend improvements

87dfe3c: Makefile: fix «make install_qemu CONFIG_QEMU=y» for minimal targets

7c04c75: memset64/memcpy64: use versions from b831cb1; fix calls from Magic Zoom to ensure proper alignment

375fa4e: Backout b831cb1 (breaks Magic Zoom and CONFIG_MARK_UNUSED_MEMORY_AT_STARTUP, as memset64 is not the same as memset)

287c785: adv_int: ignore empty lines when loading keyframes

6239bc6: adv_int: use strstr instead of my_strstr (fixes slow load)

284656a: Include strstr in ML core

ef21d82: adv_int: refactor keyframe time formatting

5ca412b: adv_int: auto-load the saved sequence at startup

a4869c8: adv_int: renamed menu entry to «Ramping options»

86accb6: Memory backend: drop timestamps from history; show last 1024 events

d016ccf: Memory backend: show total allocations (number and amount), including untracked ones

0e56fe7: Memory backend: allow using shoot_malloc as a last resort, even for small blocks;
allow small blocks (smaller than minimum_free_space / 64) to break the minimum_free_space limit (until minimum_free_space / 4)
fine-tuned until the old set of Lua scripts were able to run on 1100D without umm_malloc

28bf259: Memory backend: a pointer to task names (rather than copying the full string) should be enough

a67b3ed: Memory backend: renamed memcheck_mallocbuf to memcheck_entries

b831cb1: Moved memset64 and memcpy64 to bench.mo
— simplified to accept only 32-bit aligned pointers
— using regular memset for Magic Zoom
— closing issue #1995

d7866ee: Memory backend: if shoot_malloc fails, try SRM next
(poor man’s autodetection, since we don’t know how to query the available size in advance)

ee7abdb: exmem: reworked shoot_malloc to handle large requests better
— moved autodetection to dedicated functions (for both fragmented and continuous allocations)
— autodetect the max available size for large requests (slower, but when it fails, it fails gracefully)

bd7a1dd: exmem: removed the «relaxed» checks introduced in 04f02a4
(not sure why they were needed; we’ll find out if it fails)

766ffbb: exmem: speed-up shoot_malloc
(1s timeout probably not needed)

51f6129: exmem: do not keep track of full shoot memory allocations
(allows reserving some memory in advance and allocating all the remaining RAM afterwards)

f12eba5: Memory backend: fix handling of untracked blocks
(possible buffer overflow before this fix)

f9f3358: Memory backend: figured out why AllocateContinuousMemoryResource may crash with many small blocks
(todo: figure out where to keep 89e3b12 or not; adapt tests if not)

e4fd29d: Memory backend: when checking available memory, allocate both Shoot ans SRM at the same time
(they may overlap)

1162fce: Memory backend: fix initialization

67f582f: mem.c: option to disable heap poisoning
(useful when running in QEMU with -d memcheck — with this, overflowing reads will be caught as well)

26f1647: Memory backend: allow breaking minimum_free_space for small blocks
(it was possible to fail the allocation for very small blocks that could not be covered by shoot_malloc)

c6d6699: Memory backend: allow AllocateMemory as a last resort, even if free space is below limit
(it was possible to fail the allocation for very small blocks that could not be covered by shoot_malloc)

1e4985e: memory backend: reduce memcheck area (should reduce overhead a bit)

4e59a74: memory backend: ignore null pointers passed to free (Lua does that)

2ade4a5: exmem: when autodetecting available memory, print all srm/shoot memory blocks to console

fee1ee2: edmac: make sure the log files don’t have unnecessary newlines
(channels with complex size configuration may get printed on multiple lines; that makes the log file harder to parse)

1508a54: edmac: LOG_INTERVAL can now be changed from menu (persistent setting)

564b0c5: edmac: use numbered log file names

edcb52f: edmac: fix behavior when the extra info buffer gets full

056e56e: edmac: use half-shutter as trigger for logging EDMAC channels;
fine-tuned messages

2eddc9f: edmac: fix crash on models other than 5D3
(there was a hardcoded stub)

4b161ce: edmac: fix crash when using «Log EDMAC usage» on D4 models

bc3bd0d: Merged unified into edmac

b4a8fad: Added edmac.mo to nightly builds

2061922: edmac-memcpy: check to make sure all models have AbortEDmac
(to make sure it’s correct: selftest.mo -> Stubs API test)

fff0aeb: edmac.mo: display connection map (experiment)

If you don’t need anything from the above list, please consider downgrading to 1.1.3.

A few ML features are not compatible with 1.2.3 (see the Features tab and the 1.1.3 forum thread). If you need any of these features, you will have to downgrade to 1.1.3.

Installation

  1. Make sure you are running Canon firmware 1.2.3.
    If you are running 1.3.3, 1.3.4 or 1.3.5, you can downgrade with EOS Utility (instructions).
    There is no known way (for now) to downgrade from 1.3.6!
  2. Format the card from the camera.
  3. Unzip the archive and copy ML files to the memory card.
  4. Run the Firmware Update process from Canon menu.

This procedure will enable the BOOTDISK flag in your camera’s Flash ROM, allowing it to load and execute custom code from the memory card. A copy of the original (unmodified) ROM contents will be saved to the card.

Magic Lantern will run from this card; it won’t replace your original firmware.

  • After installation, please copy your ROM backup files (ML/LOGS/ROM*.BIN on the card) to a safe place.
  • Detailed instructions on the wiki. Please don’t forget to check the FAQ and the user guide.

    Uninstallation

    From camera:
    1. Run Firmware Update from your ML card.
    2. Follow the on-screen instructions, including the fine print.

    This procedure disables the BOOTDISK flag. You will no longer be able to run Magic Lantern, unless you reinstall it.

    Some settings changed by Magic Lantern might be persistent; this procedure will not reset them. To restore the camera to factory state, you may also want to clear all camera settings and custom functions from Canon menu.

    What Magic Lantern reveals – 5D Mark III capable of 4K all along

    Table of Contents

    Available now! The new EOSHD 5D Mark III 3.5K RAW Shooter’s Guide

    With the new Magic Lantern experimental build for the 5D Mark III, we have an amazing 4K and 3.5K 10bit lossless raw mode with Super 35mm continuous recording.

    Did you know that the Mayans invented the wheel, but only used it for a child’s toy and didn’t really see the point?

    Then the Sumerian civilisation came along and finally put it to good use! Well it turns out Canon have had sensors in their DSLRs since 2012 which have been capable of 4K video… but they just kinda sat on it.

    Why did they ignore this technology and refuse to activate it?

    Look at the RAW video menu above, just look at it.

    It’s a veritable amusement park of camera geek features… a forbidden contraband hack that should never have been possible…and here’s how Canon probably feels about you enjoying yourself over it…

    It is with the new 3.5K mode that things really start to get exciting

    Alas it is with 3.5K not the 4K where the really illicit action is with the 5D Mark III.

    This is a continuous recording mode with a workable low-res, low-fps preview of your scene for accurate framing.

    More on that in a moment (I was so excited about it, I wrote a book about it).

    The 4K is more a proof of concept, whereas the 3.5K mode is actually usable for all sorts of filming.

    In 4K we have 3840 pixels horizontal, which is exactly a 1.5x crop (Super 35mm) of the full frame 22MP sensor. Magic Lantern doesn’t yet unlock the vertical resolution required for 16:9 but 3840 x 1536 is a beautiful cinematic result with 2.50:1 aspect ratio similar to cinemascope.

    The 3840 x 1536 mode is part of a previously discovered sensor mode for 3K and 4K recording, but this mode didn’t work in 10bit or 12bit raw and the live view display looked like this:

    Then Magic Lantern discovered a 3.5K mode which DOES record with lossless raw compression, meaning the data rate becomes manageable enough for recording to Compact Flash cards for longer than a few seconds. What’s more, this 3.5K mode allows the use of lower bit-depths such as 10bit and 12bit rather than the full 14bit of the uncompressed raw modes. The final big advantage of this mode is you can get a working live-view image, although the quality and frame rate is a big drop from the standard Canon live-view.

    In 10bit with lossless raw compression the write speed required is 90MB/s for 3.5K raw, bang on the limit for continuous recording to compact flash card at the mammoth resolution of:

    The image is truly glorious to behold and is practically a Super 35mm 1.6x crop of the sensor. Perfect for APS-C lenses like the Sigma 18-35mm F1.8. Here’s a 3.5K frame capture from my shoot –

    The various modes work as follows:

    • Continuous recording at 3.5K (3584 x 1320) 10bit lossless raw (working live-view)
    • Continuous recording at 3K (3072 x 1308) 14bit lossless raw (non-working live-view)
    • 2 seconds recording at 4K (3840 x 1536) 14bit lossless raw (non-working live-view)

    The lossless raw discovery is what makes these resolutions recordable, bringing the data rate under the limitations of the compact flash card slot. 10bit is just the icing on the cake. I find the image to be very nice indeed in 10bit, not a noticeable drop in quality from 14bit.

    The 5D Mark III has a full frame 5.5K sensor of course so depending on the resolution you choose to record at, these modes involve various crop factors over full frame –

    • 1.5x in 14bit 4k (Super 35mm)
    • 1.6x in 10bit 3.5K (Canon APS-C)
    • 1.86x in 14bit 3K (think GH2)

    So I think 10bit 3.5K is definitely the sweet spot here (with a nice 48% raw compression); the crop is a little bit much in 14bit 3K and the data rate is too high in 4K for continuous recording.

    How practical is it?

    The 3.5K works creatively and is great for enthusiasts who want the ultimate image quality and raw for the cheapest price possible from a very advanced Canon sensor, in a small form factor.

    These features are hacks, experiments and reverse engineered rather than officially enabled by the manufacturer. As a result, in the 3.5K mode with working colour live-view image, the refresh rate is slow and it reverts to monochrome when you hit record. Certainly better than nothing and it is a miracle this works at all. It’s all down to the incredible skill of the Magic Lantern dev team that we have this feature. I probably wouldn’t use it for paid work though.

    It must be said the limited live-view picture does make a shoot more challenging… certain shots more tricky and does restrict you to mainly locked-down tripod shots. Lots of deliberate camera movement during the recording is going to leave you scratching your head as to true pace and timings of the action. Via HDMI you get a nice punched-in high resolution image which is ideal for focus checking, but composition remains on the back LCD.

    The 1080p 60p raw has a nice fast high resolution live-view image though. Yes, it seems the 5D Mark III could do 1080/60p all along as well but Canon didn’t enable that either!!

    Anamorphic mode 4K

    The camera can also shoot in 4:3 aspect at 2240 x 1680 so one way to get continuous 4K RAW recording out of the 5D Mark III is to cheat.

    With an anamorphic lens you can keep the vertical resolution at a very nice 1680 pixels, which is a higher vertical resolution than the camera shoots in 3.5K and 4K mode… quite close to the standard 2160 pixels tall you get from UHD in 16:9.

    With a 2x anamorphic lens the image upscales to 4480 pixels wide in post, from the 2240 wide one out of the camera. Even when upscaled this way, I think 4480 x 1680 is more than enough resolution for great looking 4K although it will be a bit softer horizontally than the 3.5K!

    Did Canon leave out 4K for technical reasons?

    The 3.5K and 4K modes of the 5D Mark III do produce a bit more heat and run the battery down a bit quicker than the standard 1080p modes. Your card will get hotter as well. My camera has not shut down yet from overheating in 3.5K and I take comfort from the fact the 1D C is of the same 2012 generation of hardware and neither does that have any overheating issues shooting 4K. Inside the camera, the sensor does this 3.5K readout whenever you use the focus magnification tool (with or without Magic Lantern), so that part of the hardware itself is running within spec. Your sensor is not going to explode.

    One possible technical reason Canon could have had for not including 4K is the rolling shutter is a bit worse than in 1080p, but not really much different to what my 1D C does in 4K. It’s very manageable and depends on how you shoot and what you’re shooting. It helps to use a wider lens and stabilisation. If Canon left 4K video out due to a bit of rolling shutter, they are wimps!!

    What about cards? When the 5D Mark III was released in 2012 the new 1000x speed cards were only just coming into fruition. However if Canon had used MJPEG or H.264 to compress 4K we would have had a mini 1D C. It’s 14bit raw that’s the challenge for the cards, not 4K MJPEG.

    What about battery life? With the sensor switched to a power hungry mode featuring a 4K pixel readout, it certainly does reduce battery life during use. The thing is, in stills mode and normal 1080p it doesn’t make a difference whether the camera features 4K or not. Here the camera would be set to standard live-view with a normal binned sensor readout. Furthermore shooting through the optical viewfinder would not even engage the sensor so there would be no impact in general use, only when shooting in 4K mode.

    The image you get from this is simply outstanding. I am able to slide the exposure slider up and down in Resolve like George in Seinfeld uses his right hand. The shadows are just so clean, you see what looks like unrecoverable blackness and it seamlessly springs to life. The colours, as you’d expect from raw and a Canon sensor are just stunningly beautiful, like a raw still. Amazing dynamic range and detail. I found I was getting the best quality raw in Resolve of all the workflows, going to 10bit ProRes 4:2:2 in there is the best, then into the editing software (I explain my workflow techniques and recommended software in the guide).

    Magic lantern 5d mark iii

    Magic Lantern is a software enhancement that offers increased functionality to the excellent Canon DSLR cameras. We have created an open framework, licensed under GPL, for developing extensions to the official firmware.

    Magic Lantern is not a «hack», or a modified firmware, it is an independent program that runs alongside Canon’s own software. Each time you start your camera, Magic Lantern is loaded from your memory card. Our only modification was to enable the ability to run software from the memory card.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    What is it?

    5D Mark II configured for film making with follow focus, matte box, rails, preamp and dolly

    Magic Lantern is an enhancement atop of Canon’s firmware that frees your Canon DSLR, allowing you to use many useful features. Initially developed for filmmakers, it now has functionality for both photo and video enthusiasts, including manual audio, zebras, focus assist tools, bracketing, motion detection and much more. It is an open (GPL) framework for developing extensions to the official software. It does not replace the existing firmware, but instead runs along side of it. There is no need to «uninstall» it — simply format your card to reboot to the stock Canon firmware.

    Is it only for video?

    Initially, Magic Lantern was developed by independent filmmakers and tailored for video production on 5D Mark II. Things changed when Magic Lantern was ported to smaller (APS-C) cameras, like 550D, 60D, 600D and 500D, which attracted developers interested in both still photography and DSLR video.

    Where do I get it?

    Will it break my camera?

    As of September 2009 the software has been downloaded over two thousand times and there have been no reports of damage to the cameras. While this is no guarantee of absolute safety, the stable releases have been tested by beta testers. Most of the risk is to the developers’ cameras while testing new features and probing new portions of Canon’s firmware. By the time the software moves from development to beta testing it has been installed hundreds or thousands of times.

    What can I do to help?

    If you’re a programmer skilled in ARM assembly, embedded systems, GUI programming and don’t mind risking your expensive camera, get the source code, join the forum, edit the wiki and make improvements.

    Where do I report bugs?

    For general tech-support, join the forum. For bugs and enhancement requests, use the issue tracker.

    Why not just buy a video camera?

    Arriflex ST versus the 5D, by Olivier Koos

    If you can find a video camera that a) shoots HD, b) has a 50 mbps data rate, c) has interchangable lenses, d) has a 35 mm or larger sensor and e) costs less than $25k (without lenses, like the RED One), then buy that one instead. There are limitations to shooting movies on a 5D Mark II, notably the limited 12 minute recording time and lack of balanced audio inputs, but a ArriCam Lite only records 5 minutes of Super 35 and a high quality preamp like the juicedLink CX231 provides balanced inputs. The lack of auto-focus in movie mode isn’t a problem either — movies are focused manually with a follow-focus like the Cinevate Durus.

    Will it work on my camera?

    7D being reverse engineered

    Check the nightly builds page — if your camera is listed there, it already works.

    If your camera is not listed on the nightly builds page, the short answer is: maybe. Longer answer: The CHDK project successfully supports many different cameras running different operating systems, but finding the necessary kernel entry points is a very time consuming process. Since Magic Lantern is publicly available, someone with the time, the hardware and the inclination to port it to other cameras can do so.

    The 40D, 450D, 1000D and 5Dmk1 are similar in hardware, but they run vxWorks and would be lots of effort to support. It may be easier to port 400plus instead. See also Other_dslr.

    For Panasonic GH1 and GH2, please check http://www.gh1-hack.info/. This is a completely different bit of hardware and would require an entire from-scratch reverse engineering effort in order to port Magic Lantern.

    There is also an effort in reverse engineering the Pentax K10/GX10 and K20/GX20 cameras. As of August 2009 they have been able to decrypt the firmware update and are making progress in understanding how the camera works.

    For more questions about the Magic Lantern firmware, see the full FAQ

    Magic Lantern enables Canon 5D Mark III Raw v > Published May 13, 2013 | dpreview staff

    Looking for ways to speed up the development.
    How many of you would be willing to support our work?

    (also on Twitter)

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    Magic Lantern – radzimy, jak zainstalować alternatywne oprogramowanie lustrzanki

    Jeśli kiedykolwiek mieliście w ręku lustrzankę cyfrową, doskonale zdajecie sobie sprawę z tego, jak wysoką funkcjonalnością charakteryzują się te aparaty. Zwłaszcza sprzęt, który pojawił się w przeciągu ostatnich dwóch lat. Bywa jednak i tak, że to, co oferuje nam producent i to, co otrzymujemy po zakupie, nie ukazuje w pełni możliwości sprzętu. Na szczęście w sieci co jakiś czas pojawiają się alternatywy dla oficjalnego oprogramowania, napisane przez użytkowników, którzy dostrzegli luki w sofcie i starają się je załatać lub po prostu w stu procentach wykorzystać potencjał urządzenia. Przykładem takiej alternatywy jest Magic Lantern.

  • Niektórzy miłośnicy marki Canon mogą już kojarzyć nazwę Magic Lantern. To oprogramowanie na licencji GPL (wolne) napisane przez grupę hakerów, programistów, ale przede wszystkim użytkowników lustrzanek Canona. Jest dedykowane wybranym aparatom tej marki (poniżej przedstawiamy listę). Stanowi nie tyle alternatywę dla oficjalnego softu, co jego uzupełnienie. Z początku było tworzone jedynie z myślą o funkcji filmowania, jednak wraz z pojawianiem się kolejnych wersji, wśród opcji zagościły ciekawe rozwiązania dotyczące trybu fotografowania.

    Jakie aparaty wspierane są przez Magic Lantern?

    W obecnej chwili trwają prace nad kompatybilnością softu z modelami: M, 7D, 5D3, 5Dc, 1100D i 40D.

    Magic Lantern w skrócie

    Na co możemy między innymi liczyć? Na przykład automatyczne wykrywanie i oznaczanie na podglądzie prześwietlonych partii zdjęcia, zaawansowaną kontroęa czułości ISO i ilości klatek na sekundę w trybie filmowania, czy też tak zwany Focus Stacking, ściągający z naszych barków trudniejszą część wykonywania zdjęć o lokalnie zwiększonej głębi ostrości. Do tego dochodzi możliwość korekty ostrości za pomocą przycisków oraz całą masa wskaźników. Wymieniłem tylko kilka z dodatkowych funkcji, ale według mnie cały soft zasługuje na uwagę.

    Program uruchamiamy go z poziomu nośnika pamięci, a po wyciągnięciu karty i ponownym uruchomieniu aparatu powracamy do poprzednich, oryginalnych ustawień.

    Każdy, kto kiedykolwiek słyszał lub czytał o alternatywnym oprogramowaniu wie, że taki soft może uszkodzić lustrzankę, a nawet przekreślić szanse na naprawę na gwarancji. Warto jednak podkreślić, że Magic Lantern nie jest softem zastępującym oficjalne oprogramowanie. To jedynie łatka, której nawet nie instalujemy w wewnętrznej pamięci aparatu. Program jest bootowalny, co oznacza, że uruchamiamy go z poziomu nośnika pamięci, a po wyciągnięciu karty i ponownym uruchomieniu aparatu powracamy do poprzednich, oryginalnych ustawień. To znacznie zmniejsza ryzyko wystąpienia systemowego błędu, który zawiesi nam aparat.

    Nie można też zapominać, że platforma jest napisana na licencji GPL, a to oznacza że pobieramy ją całkowicie za darmo. Nie wiąże się to z żadnymi płatnościami i mikropłatnościami. Oczywiście istnieje system przekazywania pieniędzy autorom, ale raczej jako forma zapłaty i podziękowania za dobrze zrobiony soft oraz jako forma zachęty do dalszej pracy nad aktualizacjami. Brzmi do tej pory zachęcająco? Zerknijmy jak wygląda proces instalacji. Nie jest skomplikowany, ale przeprowadzimy was przez niego krok po kroku.

    Magic Lantern krok po kroku

    Zanim cokolwiek pobierzemy upewnijmy się, że posiadamy odpowiednią wersję oficjalnego oprogramowania. W tym celu wchodzimy w naszej lustrzance, w trybie M, do głównego Menu i nawigujemy do zakładki, w której widnieje numer naszego firmware’u. Dla każdego modelu jest to inna wersja. Najlepiej sprawdzić tą informację na stronie projektu. Dla swojego Canona EOS 600D potrzebowałem aktualizacji oznaczonej numerem 1.0.2. Oryginalny soft można pobrać ze strony producenta. Tam też znajdziemy instrukcję aktualizacji.

    Przed instalacją sprawdź wersję oprogramowania / fot. fotoManiaK.pl

    Następnie ściągamy najnowszą, stabilną wersję Magic Lantern. Bezpośredni link znajdziemy pod tym adresem. Teraz trzeba przygotować naszą lustrzankę do instalacji. W tym celu musimy naładować do pełna baterię (autorzy zalecają stosowanie oryginalnych baterii) oraz zdjąć z aparatu jakiekolwiek akcesoria. Warto też przywrócić ustawienia fabryczne. Na koniec upewnijmy się, że pozostawiamy aparat w trybie M.

    Musimy przygotować kartę pamięci, najpierw ją formatujemy / fot. fotoManiaK.pl

    Następnym krokiem jest przygotowanie nośnika pamięci. Potrzebujemy czystą kartę pamięci (32-gigabajtową, bądź mniejszą). Formatujemy ją z poziomu lustrzanki, a następnie wkładamy do czytnika kart w komputerze i rozpakowujemy wszystkie pliki z pobranej paczki z ML, bezpośrednio na nośnik pamięci. Teraz ponownie wrzucamy kartę pamięci do naszego aparatu.

    Uruchamiamy aparat (jeśli nie pozostawiliśmy go włączonego) i wchodzimy w główne Menu. Nawigujemy znowu do zakładki z wersją softu i wchodzimy w tą opcję. Teraz pozostaje tylko uruchomić proces aktualizacji i cierpliwie poczekać, aż pojawi się nam zapisany zielonymi literami ekran potwierdzający udaną aktualizację. Na sam koniec wyłączamy i uruchamiamy ponownie lustrzankę.

    Uwaga: Jeśli podczas procesu aktualizacji pojawi się jakiś błąd wystarczy wyłączyć aparat, wyciągnąć na dłuższą chwilę baterię, po czym ponownie ją włożyć i uruchomić raz jeszcze lustrzankę.

    Z początku nie zobaczymy żadnych zmian. Jednak wystarczy podnieść lustro, by przejść do podglądu Live View. Jeśli wszystko dobrze zrobiliśmy powinny się nam na ekranie pojawić paski poziomu dźwięku zbieranego przez mikrofon. Do Menu ML wchodzimy z kolei klikając na przycisk Kosza.

    Gratuluję. Zainstalowaliście Magic Lantern.

    Uwaga: w kolejnych częściach poradnika opiszemy dokładniej poszczególne opcje odblokowane przez ML oraz to, co możemy z nimi zrobić.

    Najnowsze Magic Lantern pozwala na kręcenie w > MARCIN FALANA • dawno temu • 2 komentarze

    Magic Lantern swoim najnowszym oprogramowaniem pokazuje, że 5-letni korpus Canon EOS 5D Mark III może nagrywać filmy w 4K.

    Nie jest tajemnicą, że sprzęt fotograficzny i filmowy jest często ograniczony oprogramowaniem przez producentów. Zależy im przecież na sprzedawaniu nowych urządzeń albo modeli dedykowanych do konkretnych zastosowań, zamiast wspierać starsze, uniwersalne urządzenia. Jeżeli chcemy filmować profesjonalnie, powinniśmy kupić profesjonalną kamerę — taka jest filozofia koncernów. Jednak grupa zapaleńców z Magic Lantern wciąż udoskonala możliwości filmowe aparatów Canona.

    Tym razem ekipa Magic Lantern opracowała sposób zapisu filmów 4K RAW w Canonie EOS 5D Mark III. Informacja została opublikowana 1 kwietnia i początkowo była odebrana jako żart na prima aprillis, jednak okazała się prawdą.

    Po wgraniu najnowszej wersji oprogramowania Magic Lantern do EOSa 5D Mk III będziemy mogli między innymi nagrywać filmy w 4K. Poza tym będziemy mieć możliwość nagrywać z rozdzielczościami:

    Zobacz również: Canon 5D Mark III — test

    • 1920×960, 50p
    • 1920×800, 60p
    • 1920×1080, 45p i 48p
    • 1920×1920, 24p
    • 3072×1920, 24p
    • 3840×1600, 24p
    • 4096×2560, 12.5p
    • 4096×1440, 25p

    W większości są one dostępne z przelicznikiem ogniskowej 1,5x podobnie jak z korpusami APS-C. Nie jest to też dokładnie format obrazu Super 35, który ma proporcje 16:9 i rozdzielczość 3840 x 2160. EOS 5D Mk III z Magic Lantern oferuje rozdzielczość 3840×1600. Dobrze obrazuje to grafika (poniżej) przygotowana przez serwis ESO HD.

    Pierwsze testy ujawniają też problemy z zapisem tak bogatego materiału na karcie, więc z najwyższą rozdzielczością można nagrać tylko kilka sekund filmu. Należy też pamiętać, że nie jest to oryginalne oprogramowanie i może zawierać błędy.

    Poza tym użytkownicy Magic Lantern z EOS-em 5D Mk III będą mogli wypróbować eksperymentalny, bezstratnie skompresowany tryb 14-bitowy, co ma pozwolić na zmniejszenie plików bez widocznej utraty jakości obrazu. Takie rozwiązanie daje dużo większe możliwości obróbki w procesie post produkcji.

    Jeżeli chcecie poeksperymentować z Magic Lantern i swoim EOS-e 5D Mk III, to oprogramowanie jest dostępne do ściągnięcia na stronie Magic Lantern. Uprzedzamy jednak, że można stracić gwarancję, a nawet uszkodzić sprzęt, a przecież EOS 5D Mk III to nadal bardzo przyzwoity aparat.

    10 Years of Magic Lantern

    Magic Lantern is ten years old. Happy Birthday Magic Lantern! Here at Newsshooter, I thought we should pay our respects to a team of individuals that dared to be different.

    The first public post from ten years ago about my homebrew firmware for the Canon 5D Mark 2 DSLR marks the very humble beginning of the Magic Lantern project: https://t.co/b7vbw3dJK4 pic.twitter.com/UfcCd8bD0w

    A bit of history

    In 2008 the Canon 5D Mark II changed everything. It was the first affordable full frame sensor camera capable of capturing video. It quickly became the go-to tool for budget filmmakers and it wasn’t long till people wanted to get more out of their cameras. Enter Magic Lantern.

    Image credit: Tramell Hudson

    Magic Lantern was originally written by Trammell Hudson in 2009 for the Canon EOS 5D Mark II after he managed to reverse engineer the camera’s firmware.

    Magic Lantern is a software enhancement that offers increased functionality to Canon DSLR cameras. Magic Lantern created an open framework, licensed under GPL, for developing extensions to the official firmware.

    Magic Lantern is not a “hack“, or a modified firmware, it is an independent program that runs alongside Canon’s own software. Each time you start your camera, Magic Lantern is loaded from your memory card. The only modification Magic lantern created was the ability to run software from the memory card.

    Magic Lantern was and still is a free software add-on that runs from the SD/CF card and adds a host of new features to Canon EOS cameras that weren’t included from the factory by Canon.

    Essentially Magic Lantern opens up functionality that is technically possible to run on Canon DSLR cameras.

    Because installing Magic Lantern does not replace the stock Canon firmware or modify the ROM but rather runs alongside it, it is both easy to remove and carries little risk. The camera checks a “boot flag” in its re-writable memory, and if set, reads from a memory card to get the additional firmware routines. Each time the camera is started, there is an option to disable Magic Lantern.

    Magic lantern is completely free. It doesn’t cost anything to download or use.

    Why use Magic Lantern?

    You may be asking why anyone would want to use Magic Lantern and mess around with their camera to change how it performs. Well quite simply, because they can.

    Most cameras are a lot more capable and powerful than you may think. In some cases, cameras from manufacturers have had features or capabilities restricted solely by the firmware they are running. The majority of cameras being released today are a lot more capable than you may think, but that doesn’t mean camera companies are willing to give you the keys to the front door and turn the alarm off.

    In saying this, companies have to make products reliable and stable and if an engineer thinks that a camera can’t do a particular function with a zero fail rate they are not going to implement that feature into the camera. Companies also have to protect other products in their line up and they also need to make money. Making a completely open source camera doesn’t make financial sense to a large corporation or company.

    My personal view

    Magic Lantern offers a greatly improved feature set which turns Canon DSLRs into much more fully feature video cameras. You simply download the files to each memory card you use, pop it into the camera and load the new firmware. Then each time you start the camera it can automatically find the firmware on your memory card and reload it.

    However, in my past experience, I have found it to be less than 100% reliable in critical conditions, with the occasional lockup that required me to reboot the camera by reinserting the battery. For this reason, I have stayed away from using it for the type of work I do where missing a key moment is not an option. My cameras need to be 100% reliable, end of story.

    It is also technically going to void any warranty you have on the camera and there is always that slight chance that you could irreversibly turn it into a paperweight.

    All that said it is amazing that a global team working together was able to add video features to existing Canon cameras.

    Is this all legal?

    Both USA and European laws allow reverse engineering for interoperability, without requiring the permission from the copyright holder (in this case, Canon).

    Since Magic Lantern is not distributing any Canon code and they are just reverse engineering solely for purposes of interoperability, Magic Lantern does not run afoul of the law.

    Magic lantern is keen to point out that they do not publish Canon code or any other copyrighted material – be it from Canon or from any other third party. The only information they publish is limited information about DSLR internals, with the only purpose of achieving interoperability. Reverse engineering is required to achieve interoperability because no public documentation is available to create software for Canon DSLRs.

    Canon has never officially made statements about Magic Lantern.

    What cameras are supported?

    Here are the cameras that are currently supported by Magic Lantern.

    Here are the cameras Magic Lantern are currently working on:

    What does Magic lantern allow you to do?

    Well, a lot! Below is a list of features that Magic Lantern adds:

    • Full control over H264 bitrate.
    • Full control of recording framerate.
    • Record HDR v >

    This was shot by James Miller with the Magic Lantern 5D3 Raw firmware. Captured at 1920 x 720 @25p

    The above v >5D Mark III with a Sigma Art 35mm and a 64GB Lexar 1066x CF-Card . It was shot in in 3520×1320 in 10bit-lossless at 23,976 fps using the crop_rec module. The files were mounted w/ MLVFS, graded in DaVinci, exported to DNxHR HQX 10bit, edited in Premiere and finally exported to 4K DNxHR HQX 10bit.

    The above footage was shot in Magic Lantern Raw format and color corrected with Davinci Resolve. A 5D MKIII , Sigma 50 mm f/1.4 , and Canon 100 mm f/2.8 lens was used.

    What does the future hold?

    Magic Lantern will continue to press forward, adding more features and testing out other camera models.

    No matter how you feel about running third party firmware on a camera, you have to give credit to Trammell Hudson and the team over at Magic Lantern. Not only did they give users of Canon DSLR cameras enhanced features and capabilities, but they also give away the product for free.

    There is always going to a select few companies and people who were pioneers in our industry, and Magic Lantern is certainly one of those pioneers. Happy birthday Magic lantern and thanks for all you have done and continue to do.

    You can find more information about Magic Lantern on their website.

    Matthew Allard is a multi-award-winning, ACS accredited freelance Director of Photography with 30 years’ experience working in more than 50 countries around the world.

    He is the Editor of Newsshooter.com and has been writing on the site since 2010.

    Matthew has won 41 ACS Awards, including four prestigious Golden Tripods. In 2016 he won the Award for Best Cinematography at the 21st Asian Television Awards.

    Matthew is available to hire as a DP in Japan or for work anywhere else in the world.

    Magic lantern 5d mark iii

    7a3b5fa: Ghost image: further cleanups and fixes

    4702ca0: Ghost image: fix crash (issues #2796, #2783, #2878, #2885)

    94442d9: features.tmpl edited online with Bitbucket: use id in th section heading to allow for direct linking via anchor

    5e40987: Merged in edmac (pull request #886)
    EDMAC module: fixes for DIGIC 4, connection map

    b54a0c6: Merged in adv_int (pull request #907)
    Advanced intervalometer updates

    58e11ee: Merged in memory-backend (pull request #906)
    Memory backend improvements

    87dfe3c: Makefile: fix «make install_qemu CONFIG_QEMU=y» for minimal targets

    7c04c75: memset64/memcpy64: use versions from b831cb1; fix calls from Magic Zoom to ensure proper alignment

    375fa4e: Backout b831cb1 (breaks Magic Zoom and CONFIG_MARK_UNUSED_MEMORY_AT_STARTUP, as memset64 is not the same as memset)

    287c785: adv_int: ignore empty lines when loading keyframes

    6239bc6: adv_int: use strstr instead of my_strstr (fixes slow load)

    284656a: Include strstr in ML core

    ef21d82: adv_int: refactor keyframe time formatting

    5ca412b: adv_int: auto-load the saved sequence at startup

    a4869c8: adv_int: renamed menu entry to «Ramping options»

    86accb6: Memory backend: drop timestamps from history; show last 1024 events

    d016ccf: Memory backend: show total allocations (number and amount), including untracked ones

    0e56fe7: Memory backend: allow using shoot_malloc as a last resort, even for small blocks;
    allow small blocks (smaller than minimum_free_space / 64) to break the minimum_free_space limit (until minimum_free_space / 4)
    fine-tuned until the old set of Lua scripts were able to run on 1100D without umm_malloc

    28bf259: Memory backend: a pointer to task names (rather than copying the full string) should be enough

    a67b3ed: Memory backend: renamed memcheck_mallocbuf to memcheck_entries

    b831cb1: Moved memset64 and memcpy64 to bench.mo
    — simplified to accept only 32-bit aligned pointers
    — using regular memset for Magic Zoom
    — closing issue #1995

    d7866ee: Memory backend: if shoot_malloc fails, try SRM next
    (poor man’s autodetection, since we don’t know how to query the available size in advance)

    ee7abdb: exmem: reworked shoot_malloc to handle large requests better
    — moved autodetection to dedicated functions (for both fragmented and continuous allocations)
    — autodetect the max available size for large requests (slower, but when it fails, it fails gracefully)

    bd7a1dd: exmem: removed the «relaxed» checks introduced in 04f02a4
    (not sure why they were needed; we’ll find out if it fails)

    766ffbb: exmem: speed-up shoot_malloc
    (1s timeout probably not needed)

    51f6129: exmem: do not keep track of full shoot memory allocations
    (allows reserving some memory in advance and allocating all the remaining RAM afterwards)

    f12eba5: Memory backend: fix handling of untracked blocks
    (possible buffer overflow before this fix)

    f9f3358: Memory backend: figured out why AllocateContinuousMemoryResource may crash with many small blocks
    (todo: figure out where to keep 89e3b12 or not; adapt tests if not)

    e4fd29d: Memory backend: when checking available memory, allocate both Shoot ans SRM at the same time
    (they may overlap)

    1162fce: Memory backend: fix initialization

    67f582f: mem.c: option to disable heap poisoning
    (useful when running in QEMU with -d memcheck — with this, overflowing reads will be caught as well)

    26f1647: Memory backend: allow breaking minimum_free_space for small blocks
    (it was possible to fail the allocation for very small blocks that could not be covered by shoot_malloc)

    c6d6699: Memory backend: allow AllocateMemory as a last resort, even if free space is below limit
    (it was possible to fail the allocation for very small blocks that could not be covered by shoot_malloc)

    1e4985e: memory backend: reduce memcheck area (should reduce overhead a bit)

    4e59a74: memory backend: ignore null pointers passed to free (Lua does that)

    2ade4a5: exmem: when autodetecting available memory, print all srm/shoot memory blocks to console

    fee1ee2: edmac: make sure the log files don’t have unnecessary newlines
    (channels with complex size configuration may get printed on multiple lines; that makes the log file harder to parse)

    1508a54: edmac: LOG_INTERVAL can now be changed from menu (persistent setting)

    564b0c5: edmac: use numbered log file names

    edcb52f: edmac: fix behavior when the extra info buffer gets full

    056e56e: edmac: use half-shutter as trigger for logging EDMAC channels;
    fine-tuned messages

    2eddc9f: edmac: fix crash on models other than 5D3
    (there was a hardcoded stub)

    4b161ce: edmac: fix crash when using «Log EDMAC usage» on D4 models

    bc3bd0d: Merged unified into edmac

    b4a8fad: Added edmac.mo to nightly builds

    2061922: edmac-memcpy: check to make sure all models have AbortEDmac
    (to make sure it’s correct: selftest.mo -> Stubs API test)

    fff0aeb: edmac.mo: display connection map (experiment)

    If you need anything from the above list, please upgrade to 1.2.3.

    However, please be aware some ML features are not present in 1.2.3 (see the Features tab and the 1.1.3 forum thread).

    Recommended card setup

    • install Magic Lantern to an SD card
    • use CF card(s) for taking pictures or recording videos

    However, any card configuration may be used.

    Installation

    1. Make sure you are running Canon firmware 1.1.3.
      If you are running 1.3.3, 1.3.4 or 1.3.5, you can downgrade with EOS Utility (instructions).
      There is no known way (for now) to downgrade from 1.3.6!
    2. Format the card from the camera.
    3. Unzip the archive and copy ML files to the memory card.
    4. Run the Firmware Update process from Canon menu.

    This procedure will enable the BOOTDISK flag in your camera’s Flash ROM, allowing it to load and execute custom code from the memory card. A copy of the original (unmodified) ROM contents will be saved to the card.

    Magic Lantern will run from this card; it won’t replace your original firmware.

  • After installation, please copy your ROM backup files (ML/LOGS/ROM*.BIN on the card) to a safe place.
  • Detailed instructions on the wiki. Please don’t forget to check the FAQ and the user guide.

    Uninstallation

    From camera:
    1. Run Firmware Update from your ML card.
    2. Follow the on-screen instructions, including the fine print.

    This procedure disables the BOOTDISK flag. You will no longer be able to run Magic Lantern, unless you reinstall it.

    Some settings changed by Magic Lantern might be persistent; this procedure will not reset them. To restore the camera to factory state, you may also want to clear all camera settings and custom functions from Canon menu.

    Ile można wyciągnąć ze „starego” Canona EOS 5D Mark III? — na przykład wideo 4K RAW

    Twórcy magicznego oprogramowania Magic Lantern dla aparatów Canona pracują nad implementacją trybu wideo 4K RAW w Canonie EOS 5D Mark III.

    Branża foto to ostatnio dobry materiał na defetystyczne teksty, które wieszczą coraz gorszą jej przyszłość. Istotnie do takich wniosków można dojść przyglądając się częstości wprowadzania nowych modeli i porównując je ze starszymi. Nie każdy producent się z nimi zgodzi, choćby Sony, któremu bardzo udał się model Sony A7S i jego następca. Czy jednak Sony oponowałoby z tezą, że ich starsze aparaty cyfrowe mogłyby dać dużo więcej z siebie niż pozwala na to fabryczne oprogramowanie? Chyba nie.

    Czytając o możliwościach nowych chipsetów czy sensorów, jeszcze przed ich premierą w konkretnych produktach, spodziewamy się pomyślnej implementacji tych funkcji. A jednak zwykle producenci okrajają potencjał sprzętu ku niezadowoleniu użytkowników.

    Czasem można spróbować ten potencjał przywrócić. Wymaga to sporej znajomości technik programowania sensorów, jak i konstrukcji tych układów. Taką wiedzą mogą pochwalić się ludzie z Magic Lantern, którzy pracują obecnie nad ciekawym firmware dla Canona EOS 5D Mark III.

    To trzecie wcielenie ikony lustrzankowego wideo, domyślnie jest w stanie rejestrować jedynie wideo o rozdzielczości FullHD. Oprogramowanie Magic Lantern w niedalekiej przyszłości ma dodać nowe rozdzielczości wideo dostępne w trybie RAW:

    • 1920×960 @ 50p (odczyt piksel w piksel lub pełnej klatki z binowaniem 3×3 piksele)
    • 1920×800 @ 60p (tak jak powyżej)
    • 1920×1080 @ 45p oraz 48p (binowanie 3×3 piksele)
    • 1920×1920 @ 24p (odczyt piksel w piksel)
    • 3072×1920 @ 24p (odczyt piksel w piksel)
    • 3840×1600 @ 24p (odczyt piksel w piksel)
    • 4096×2560 @ 12.5p (odczyt piksel w piksel)
    • 4096×1440 @ 25p (odczyt piksel w piksel)
    • 5796×3870 @ 7.4 fps (podgląd na żywo całej matrycy)

    Żadna z nich nie jest typową rozdzielczością 4K, dlatego twórcy oprogramowania określają tryby zbliżone do UHD czy 4K jako 4K Super35, by uzasadnić proporcje obrazu.

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