portrait landscape

portrait landscape

How to Insert a Landscape Page Into a Portrait Document in Word

Having trouble fitting that wide graph into your document?

Page orientation in Word can become important if the content of your document requires something other than straight text. Pictures or other visual items like graphs or charts may need more space than what’s allowed with standard portrait (vertical) orientation.

Yet, while it’s easy to change the orientation of an entire Microsoft Word document, it’s less so when you only want to do it with one or a few pages. It is possible, though. You can insert a landscape-oriented (horizontal) section into a document with pages that are all in portrait orientation or vice-versa.

There are two ways to perform this action in Word, by inserting section breaks manually at the top and the bottom of the section that you want in the opposite orientation or by selecting text and allowing Word to insert the new sections for you.

This article applies to Word 2019, Word 2016, Word 2013, Word 2010, and Word for Office 365.

Manually Insert Section Breaks

Here’s how to tell Microsoft Word where to change the orientation.

In your document, place your cursor before the area where the pages should rotate. On the ribbon, select Layout.

In the Page Setup group, select Breaks > Next Page.

Move your cursor to the end of the area you want to rotate and repeat the steps above. Then, place your cursor in the area you want to rotate.

In the Page Setup group, select the Page Setup dialog box launcher (the small arrow in the lower-right corner of the group).

In the Page Setup dialog box, select the Margins tab.

In the Orientation section, select the orientation you want the section to have, Portrait or Landscape. Toward the bottom of the dialog box, in the Apply to dropdown menu, select This section. Select OK.

The selected section now reflects the orientation you chose.

Let Word Do It For You

You’ll save mouse clicks if you let Word insert the section breaks for you. However, when you use this method, the breaks may not end up exactly where you want them. So, make sure you’re careful when selecting the elements (paragraphs, images, tables, etc.) you want in the new layout orientation.

Select all the text, images, and pages that you want to switch to the new orientation.

On the ribbon, select Layout. In the Page Setup group, select the Page Setup dialog box launcher (the small arrow in the lower-right corner of the group).

In the Orientation section, select the orientation you want the section to have, Portrait or Landscape. In the Preview section, in the Apply to dropdown menu, choose Selected text. Select OK.

The selected section now reflects the orientation you chose.

You may need to perform some formatting adjustments to make the text look the way you want in the new orientation.

Change the page orientation in PowerPoint between landscape and portrait

In this course:

PowerPoint sl >landscape (horizontal) layout , but you can change the sl >portrait (vertical) layout .

Select the Design tab:

Near the right end, select Sl >Custom Slide Size.

In the Sl >Portrait, then select OK.

In the next dialog box, you can select Maximize to take full advantage of the space available, or you can select Ensure Fit to make sure that your content fits on the vertical page.

On the Design tab, in the Page Setup group, click Slide Orientation.

On the Design tab, click Slide Size.

Click Page Setup.

In the Page Setup dialog box, under Orientation, click the orientation that you want:

Portrait:

Landscape:

There are separate orientation settings for Sl >Printed notes, handouts, and outlines.

Click the Design tab of the toolbar ribbon, and then, near the right end, click Slide Size.

On the Sl >Custom Slide Size.

The Slide Size dialog box opens.

In the Sl >Portrait, and then select OK.

When PowerPoint for the web is unable to automatically scale your content, it prompts you with two options:

Maximize: Select this option to increase the size of your slide content when you are scaling to a larger slide size. Choosing this option could result in your content not fitting on the slide.

Ensure Fit: Select this option to decrease the size of your content when scaling to a smaller slide size. This could make your content appear smaller, but you’ll be able to see all content on your slide.

Changing Page Orientation (Landscape or Portrait)

All page properties for Writer text documents, like for example the page orientation, are defined by page styles. By default, a new text document uses the “Default” page style for all pages. If you open an existing text document, different page styles may have been applied to the different pages.

It is important to know that changes that you apply to a page property will only affect the pages that use the current page style. The current page style is listed in the Status Bar at the lower window border.

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To Change the Page Orientation for All Pages

If your text document consists only of pages with the same page style, you can change the page properties directly:

  1. Choose Format — Page.
  2. Click the Page tab.
  3. Under Paper format, select “Portrait” or “Landscape”.
  4. Click OK.

To Change the Page Orientation Only for Some Pages

LibreOffice uses page styles to specify the orientation of the pages in a document. Page styles define more page properties, as for example header and footer or page margins. You can either change the “Default” page style for the current document, or you can define own page styles and apply those page styles to any parts of your text.

At the end of this help page, we’ll discuss the scope of page styles in detail. If you are unsure about the page style concept, please read the section at the end of this page.

Unlike character styles or paragraph styles, the page styles don’t know a hierarchy. You can create a new page style based on the properties of an existing page style, but when you later change the source style, the new page style does not automatically inherit the changes.

To change the page orientation for all pages that share the same page style, you first need a page style, then apply that style:

  1. Choose Format — Styles and Formatting.
  2. Click the Page Styles icon.
  3. Right-click a page style and choose New. The new page style initially gets all properties of the selected page style.
  4. On the Organizer tab page, type a name for the page style in the Name box, for example «My Landscape».
  5. In the Next Style box, select the page style that you want to apply to the next page that follows a page with the new style. See the section about the scope of page styles at the end of this help page.
  6. Click the Page tab.
  7. Under Paper format, select “Portrait” or “Landscape”.
  8. Click OK.

Now you have defined a proper page style with the name «My Landscape». To apply the new style, double-click the «My Landscape» page style in the Styles and Formatting window. All pages in the current scope of page styles will be changed. If you defined the «next style» to be a different style, only the first page of the current scope of page styles will be changed.== The Scope of Page Styles ==

You should be aware of the scope of page styles in LibreOffice. Which pages of your text document get affected by editing a page style?

One Page Long Styles

A page style can be defined to span one page only. The “First Page” style is an example. You set this property by defining another page style to be the «next style», on the Format — Page — Organizer tab page.

A one page long style starts from the lower border of the current page style range up to the next page break. The next page break appears automatically when the text flows to the next page, which is sometimes called a «soft page break». Alternatively, you can insert a manual page break.

To insert a manual page break at the cursor position, press Ctrl+Enter or choose Insert — Manual Break and just click OK.

Manually Defined Range of a Page style

The “Default” page style does not set a different «next style» on the Format — Page — Organizer tab page. Instead, the «next style» is set also to be “Default”. All page styles that are followed by the same page style can span multiple pages. The lower and upper borders of the page style range are defined by «page breaks with style». All the pages between any two «page breaks with style» use the same page style.

You can insert a «page break with style» directly at the cursor position. Alternatively, you can apply the «page break with style» property to a paragraph or to a paragraph style.

Perform any one of the following commands:

  • To insert a «page break with style» at the cursor position, choose Insert — Manual Break, select a Style name from the listbox, and click OK.
  • To apply the «page break with style» property to the current paragraph, choose Format — Paragraph — Text Flow. In the Breaks area, activate Enable and With Page Style. Select a page style name from the listbox.
  • To apply the «page break with style» property to the current paragraph style, right-click the current paragraph. Choose Edit Paragraph Style from the context menu. Click the Text Flow tab. In the Breaks area, activate Enable and With Page Style. Select a page style name from the listbox.
  • To apply the «page break with style» property to an arbitrary paragraph style, choose Format — Styles and Formatting. Click the Paragraph Styles icon. Right-click the name of the paragraph style you want to modify and choose Modify. Click the Text Flow tab. In the Breaks area, activate Enable and With Page Style. Select a page style name from the listbox.

How to Change PowerPoint Slide Orientation

Change orientation first so elements don’t drop off the slide

PowerPoint lays out the slides in landscape orientation by default, meaning the slides are wider than they are tall. However, changing to portrait orientation with the slides taller than they are wide is a relatively easy change to make.

Instructions in this article apply to PowerPoint for Office 365, PowerPoint 2019, PowerPoint 2016, PowerPoint 2013, and PowerPoint 2010.

Make the change in a slide’s orientation before you lay it out. Otherwise, you might have to reorganize the work you’ve already done to prevent elements from dropping off the screen.

Change Slide Orientation in PowerPoint for Windows

The steps used to change the page orientation between landscape and portrait are the same in all versions of PowerPoint for Windows 2013 or later.

In the Normal view, click the Design tab and select Slide Size.

Select Custom Slide Size.

Use the buttons in the Orientation section to select a vertical orientation or enter dimensions in the Width and Height fields.

Select OK to apply the changes.

PowerPoint 2010 and 2007 for Windows

Follow these steps to change from landscape to portrait slide orientation in older versions of PowerPoint for Windows.

Select the Design tab, and in the Page Setup group, click Slide Orientation.

Choose Portrait.

Change Slide Orientation in PowerPoint for Mac

To change the page orientation from landscape to portrait in PowerPoint for Mac 2011.

Select the File menu and select Page Setup.

Choose OK to apply the changes.

Change Slide Orientation in PowerPoint Online

For a long time, PowerPoint Online didn’t offer a portrait orientation slide, but that has changed.

Select the Design tab.

Choose Slide Size. Select Custom Slide Size.

Select the Portrait orientation image.

Select OK to apply the changes.

You have the choice to either choose Maximize, which maximizes the use of the available slide space; or you can click Ensure fit, which makes sure that your slide content fits on the vertical portrait orientation.

Landscape and Portrait Slides in the Same Presentation

There is no simple way of combining landscape slides and portrait slides in the same presentation. If you’ve worked with slide presentations, you know that this is a basic feature. Without it, some slides won’t present the material effectively, such as with a lengthy vertical list, for example. There is a workaround if you must have this capability.

How to Turn a Portrait Image Landscape

@HarryGuinness
February 23, 2017, 8:00am EDT

It’s really annoying when you have a great photo that you want to use for something—say, your Facebook Cover Photo—but it’s the wrong aspect ratio. If you can’t take the photo again, your only hope is to use Photoshop (or any other good image editor) to try and fix things.

Let’s look at my favorite technique to do it. This trick is quick and easy, but it’s not perfect. It works best where the background is reasonably plain or abstract. If there’s anything too complex or recognizable in the background, then this technique will cause more problems than are easily fixable. It also won’t work if the subject is cut off by the edges of the image.

We’re going to take this portrait image from the dance troupe H.E.L.L’s show, the others are hell also, and turn it into a landscape image, since it has a relatively plain back and grey background.

As always, the more familiar you are with Photoshop’s tools, the easier you will find this article to follow along. If you haven’t checked out our article on Photoshop Layers, you should do so before continuing. We also have an eight part guide to Photoshop for beginners.

Step One: Re-Crop the Image

Open the image you’re using in Photoshop. The first thing you’ll want to do is to re-crop it so it’s in the right aspect ratio. This is also the time to straighten the image if it’s crooked like this one is.

Grab the Crop Tool from the Tool Bar or press C on your keyboard. If you haven’t used it before, check out our in-depth article on it.

In the Options Bar, enter the ratio 3:2. Make sure the 3 comes first otherwise you’ll end up with a portrait crop.

By default, Photoshop will keep the crop area confined to your image like it is below.

To extend it, all you need to do is grab one of the handles on the side and drag it out past the edge of the image.

Adjust the crop by clicking any where inside the crop area and dragging so that the image is roughly centered.

Make any other adjustments to the crop you want, like straightening the image as I’ve done.

When you’ve got everything looking good, press Enter.

Step Two: Extend the Background

Now that the Photoshop document is ready, it’s time to get down to the actual work of expanding the background.

Select the Rectangular Marquee Tool from the Tool Bar or use the keyboard shortcut M. If you see the Elliptical Marquee Tool instead, press Shift-M to cycle to the Rectangular Marquee Tool.

Use the Rectangular Marquee Tool to select the side of the background of the image. Be careful not to accidentally select any of the subjects of the photo.

We need to duplicate the selection to a new layer so go to Layer > New > Layer via Copy or just press the keyboard shortcut Control+J (Command+J on a Mac).

Now we have the pixels we’re going to use to extend the image on a new layer, it’s time to transform them. Go to Edit > Free Transform or use the keyboard shortcut Control+T (Command+T on a Mac).

Grab the handle on the edge farthest from the image and drag it so that the background extends to cover the blank area.

Press Enter or Return and the background is now extended on one side.

Repeat the procedure for the other edge of the image. Grab the Rectangular Marquee Tool, select a good area of the image, duplicate it to a new layer and transform it so it fills the canvas.

Step Three: Fix Any Issues

Sometimes you’ll get lucky and your image will now look great. Often though, there will be some weird looking bits on the transformed area. For example, you can see that a bit of the floor in the image I’m using has become stretched.

The next step is to use Photoshop’s other tools to go in and fix these issues. We’ve covered how to use the healing tools and the clone tools to remove problems in lots of detail before.

Assess your image and decide what will work best for it. I’ve used the Healing Brush to quickly get rid of the stretched area.

Step Four: Add Texture

The final step is to add a layer of texture to the whole image. By stretching pixels to fill the background, any of the texture that was already there will be smoothed out.

Create a new layer by going to Layer > New > Layer or use the keyboard shortcut Control+Shift+N (Command+Shift+N on a Mac).

Next, use the keyboard shortcut Control+Shift+Alt+E (Command+Shift+Option+E on a Mac) to merge everything onto that new layer.

Go to Filter > Noise > Add Noise… to bring up the Add Noise dialogue box.

This adds some random texture to the whole image. Make sure Gaussian and Monochromatic are both selected. For the Amount, enter in a value that works for your image. I’ve gone with 2%.

Let’s look at before after close up at 100%.

The floor looks so much better with the texture applied. And with that, we’re done. Here’s the finished image.

Again, this won’t work for every image, but you might be surprised by how many images it will work for. If you want to change the aspect ratio of an image, give this technique a try. Even if it doesn’t work, it only takes a few moments.

Difference Between | Descriptive Analysis and Comparisons

Key Difference: Firstly, the terms refer to types of pictures: the landscape is actually a picture of the land, while, a portrait is a picture of a person. Secondly, the terms refer to orientation, where landscape refers to something that is wider than taller, while the portrait is something that is taller rather than wider.

The terms landscape and portrait have two different meaning, however, those two meanings are interrelated. Firstly, the terms refer to types of pictures: the landscape is actually a picture of the land, while, a portrait is a picture of a person. Secondly, the terms refer to orientation, where landscape refers to something that is wider than taller, while the portrait is something that is taller rather than wider.

As per the definition referring to pictures and landscapes, a landscape is basically a picture or a photo of a piece of land. This picture or photo or representation aims to show the beauty of a piece of land. However, it can also be taken to show the barrenness and lack of beauty of that piece of land.

A portrait, on the other hand, is a picture or a photo of a person that aims to capture the look and essence of the person. In a portrait, the person is often looking directly at the camera or the painter, so that later on it looks like the painting or photo is directly engaging with the viewer. However, this may not be the case all the time, especially with more artistic or creative representations.

In addition to a picture or a photo, the portrait can also be sculpture, such as a bust or in some other form of representation of that person. The portrait can also be a detailed description of something or someone usually verbally or in writing.

As per the definition referring to page orientation, a landscape is when the length of the document is longer than its height, basically when something is wider than taller. A portrait, on the other hand, is when the length of the document is shorter than its height, or basically when something is taller than wider. Another way to say that is when the height of the document is longer than the length or width.

The definition of the terms landscape and portrait are most commonly used in printing, hence documents are most commonly and preferably printed in portrait mode, while pictures and spreadsheets may be printed in landscape mode. Additionally, a landscape picture or photo is generally printed in landscape mode, which is where the page orientation gets its name. Similarly, the portrait of a person will generally be printed in portrait mode. Hence, the page orientations are in fact named after their painting and photo styles.

Comparison between Landscape and Portrait:

Landscape

Portrait

  • A picture that shows a natural scene of land or the countryside
  • An area of land that has a particular quality or appearance
  • A particular area of activity
  • Of, relating to, or being a document having the horizontal dimension longer than the vertical dimension
  • A painting, drawing, or photograph of a person that usually only includes the person’s head and shoulders
  • A detailed description of something or someone
  • A way of printing a page so that the shorter sides are on the top and bottom and the longer sides are on the left and right

Has two different meanings:

  • A picture or photo of a piece of land
  • A document that is wider than it is taller

Has two different meanings:

  • A picture or photo of a person
  • A document that is taller than it is wider

Of a piece of land either showing its beauty or lack of beauty

Of a person with the aim of capturing their essence

Where the length of the document is longer than its height

Where the length of the document is shorter than its height.

Change Screen Orientation Portrait / Landscape in Windows 10

December 17, 2015 By Admin

Windows 10 offers the flexibility of changing orientation for normal viewing. Commonly, there are two basic modes of orientation used for viewing untill now. They are: –

Landscape mode allows the wider part of the image to be covered in which the width of the image is more than its height (e.g. Panoramic View) whereas Portrait mode allows the height of the image to be more than its width (e.g. Book View).Whenever the angle of rotation of the screen changes to 90°, the modes are inter changed (i.e. Landscape to Portrait and vice-versa) and when the angle of rotation of the screen changes to 180°, the modes are flipped (i.e. Landscape to Landscape (flipped)).

In computers, Landscape mode is preferred over the Portrait mode whereas in Mobile phones/ Tablets, Portrait mode is the sole option for display.

Windows 10 allows four different ways of Orientation. They are:-

These modes are categorized below “Customize of display” section that can be found under the “Settings” app in Windows 10.

how to change orientation of your screen in Windows 10.

Step 1: Right-click on the desktop screen anywhere and click on “Display settings” for direct path access to the display configuration settings under the “Settings” app.

Step 2: Under Display section, look for “Orientation”. In “Orientation” section, click below the drop down menu to choose any one of the following options.

If you choose any other option apart from the current viewing mode, a confirmation message will be displayed like this:

The confirmation message will start a 10 second timer for the user to decide whether he wants to go with the changed orientation or reverting back to the current one. If the users fails to choose between the two options, they current viewing mode will stay subsequently.

Saurav is associated with IT industry and computers for more than a decade and is writing on The Geek Page on topics revolving on windows 10 and softwares.

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Reader Interactions

I have three screens… Left is HD, middle is UHD, right is HD.
I have the left and right monitors rotated into portrait mode.
I used Win 10 display settings to rotate the displays accordingly.
I Apply, and OK the trial period… It works fine.
I can power cycle the computer and everything comes up correct.

HOWEVER, if I allow the computer to go to SLEEP mode,
when it comes out of SLEEP mode, the right monitor is not recognized and the left display (in Win 10) is incorrectly rotated.

I power cycle monitors. no change.
I power cycle the computer, and the previously unrecognized (right) monitor gets recognized again, but both HD monitors have the incorrect orientation.
I have to manually reconfigure the displays to portrait mode to get back the desired configuration after SLEEP mode.

Portrait vs Landscape – Which Way to Go?

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For photographers, choosing between a portrait or landscape orientation can be tricky.

In this article, we’ll have a look at portrait vs landscape orientations. We’ll see where they’re used in photography, and when to choose one over the other.

  1. Place your cursor at the very beginning of the page that you would like to flip to landscape. (We work with page 2 in our example)
  2. Select “Layout” or “Page Layout” > “Breaks” > “Next Page” to create a section.
  3. Select the “Page Layout” tab and select “Orientation” > “Landscape“.
    What this actually does is mark all pages after the break you made in step 2 as landscape. In our example, page 2, 3, 4 and forward are in landscape. Since we only want page 2 to display in landscape, we will need to change any forward pages back to portrait.
  4. Place your cursor on at the beginning of the next page (page 3 in our example) or the next page you wish to remain in portrait.
  5. Select “Page Layout” > “Breaks” > “Next Page” just like in step 2 to create another section.
  6. Select “Page Layout” tab and select “Orientation” > “Portrait“. This will make the rest of the document display in portrait.

That’s all there is to it! You have successfully made a single page landscape in Microsoft Word 2016 & 2013.

Extra Tip: If you have a header on your first page and don’t want it to be on the landscape page, you can do this (after making the page landscape):

  1. Right click on the header on the landscape page and select “Edit Header
  2. Click the “Link to Previous” button so that it is no longer highlighted.
  3. Delete the heading for that page. It should remain on page 1.
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