sony a6300 vs a6500

sony a6300 vs a6500

Sony a6300 vs a6400 vs a6500 – The 10 Main Differences

Sony has announced the a6400, the fourth model in Sony’s mirrorless APS-C series with a viewfinder that also includes the a6000, a6300 and a6500.

If you’re wondering how to differentiate these three models, the first thing you can do is to simply follow the numbers. The higher the number, the more advanced the camera, although this new entry brings some features none of the others have.

The a6400 bears a strong resemblance to its siblings if we exclude the a6000 (the oldest) and concentrate on the two cameras released in 2016: the a6300 and a6500. The question is: what can this new model bring that the other two don’t already provide? Let’s have a look in this three-way comparison preview!

a6400 comparison previews:

Ethics statement: the following is based on official press releases and our direct experience with the a6300 and a6500. Within the article, there are affiliate links. If you buy something after clicking one of these links, we will receive a small commission. To know more about our ethics, you can visit our full disclosure page. Thank you!

1. Autofocus: the a6400 gets the latest tech

The a6400 can acquire focus in 0.02s, which is faster than the already excellent 0.05s speed of the a6300 and a6500.

The three cameras share the same number of phase detection points (425). The a6300 and a6500 have 169 contrast detection areas whereas the a6500 raises that to 425 (the same number as the phase points).

The a6400 benefits from a new algorithm that improves subject motion tracking: it can detect the subject according to its colour, pattern (brightness), distance, face and eye information.

The minimum sensitivity in low light is one stop more effective on the new camera in comparison to the other two models (-2Ev vs -1Ev with an f2 aperture).

The three cameras feature EyeAF which uses a single phase detection point on the eye of the subject (stills only). It works in single and continuous autofocus.

The a6400 receives some interesting improvements: EyeAF now works when you half-press the shutter button (no need to assign it to a custom button). You can prioritise the left or right eye, or leave it on Auto.

A future firmware update (ETA summer 2019) will bring Eye AF for animals. This, combined with the new AF algorithm and 11fps burst speed, could make the a6400 an interesting budget camera for wildlife photography.

2. In-body stabilisation: exclusive to the a6500

The main feature that sets the a6500 apart from the other two models is in-body stabilisation. The sensor shift mechanism works on 5 axes (roll, pitch, yaw, X and Y) and gives your image shake correction with all lenses.

IBIS can be combined with OSS lenses (3 axes on the sensor plus Pitch/Yaw on the lens) and also works with lenses that lack electronic contacts, although only 3 axes are used.

In our extensive test with the a6500, we didn’t find the 5-axis system to be class-leading and it doesn’t provide a significant advantage over optical stabilisation alone. Jittering can be visible during video recording as well. The possibility to get decent results with non-stabilised lenses is therefore the only real advantage.

The a6300 and a6400 lack in-body stabilisation so you must rely on lenses with optical stabilisation, or gimbals for stable video recording.

3. LCD screen: 180В° tiltВ on the a6400

Out of the three, the a6300 is the model that has the least: no touch capabilities and a standard up/down tilting mechanism.

a6300 and a6500: tilting-only mechanism

The a6500 has the same tilting capabilities but comes with a touch panel that can be used to move the AF point and focus (even when composing with the EVF).

The a6400 not only gets enhanced touch capabilities but it is also the only model out of the three that allows you to rotate the screen up 180В° which facilitates selfies and V-log work.В One criticism however is that any accessory attached to the hot-shoe will make the screen unusable in that position. Perhaps a multi-angle solution with the screen flipped to the side would have been a better choice.

a6400

The monitor has the same characteristics on the three cameras: it is 3-inches in size and has 921k dots of resolution.

4. Continuous shooting speeds and buffer: the a6500 has the edge

All three cameras can shoot at 11fps with the mechanical shutter. Up to 8fps, live view with short blackouts is available, whereas at the highest speed you see the last image taken.

The a6400 receives an improvement when using the electronic shutter: burst is available up to 8fps, whereas with the a6300/a6500, only the lowest 3fps speed can be used.

The a6500 has a higher score when it comes to buffer depth. It can record 233 Extra Fine JPGs or 107 RAW frames at full speed.

The a6400 comes in second with 99 JPGs and 46 frames. The a6300 performs the worst with 44 and 23 images respectively.

I have to say I’m a bit surprised that the a6400 doesn’t share the same buffer capabilities as the a6500 since they both have the same sensor structure with a front-end LSI chip that is supposed to boost the processing speed among other things.

5. ISO sensitivity: small boost on the a6400

The three cameras are based around the same 24.2MP APS-C Exmor CMOS sensor. One thing the a6300 doesn’t share with the other two models is the LSI chip that increases the processing capabilities as mentioned in the chapter above.

The a6300 and a6500 share the same ISO range that goes from 100 to 25600. Extended values are available up to 51200.

Despite Sony claiming better performance on the a6500 model, the only thing we found in our full comparison was slightly less noise with NR set to Normal for the JPG files.

The a6400 receives a small enhancement to the normal range. It now reaches 32000 ISO while the push values go up to 102400 ISO. We have yet to see how much of a difference this will make in the real world, but it’s reasonable to think that there won’t be a huge improvement (of course we’re always happy to be proven wrong!).

Note that in video mode, the push values are not available.

6. Time-lapse: you can get it one way or the other

Owners of the a6300 and a6500 can benefit from the PlayMemories Camera Apps store. There are lots of interesting adds-on for your camera including Digital Filter, Sky HDR, etc. The bad news is that many of these apps don’t come for free, and amongst those is the Time-Lapse app (the cameras don’t have a built-in intervalometer).

PlayMemories Apps

In the last two years, Sony seems to have removed compatibility with the PlayMemories apps on its latest products such as the third-generation A7 series, which mean that the only option to have time-lapse on these products is to buy an external intervalometer.

The a6400 signals the return of time-lapse capabilities in-camera and this time it is built-in by default. You also get the option of creating a time-lapse movie with the Imaging Edge desktop suite (freeware). Hopefully this new version will come to other cameras via firmware update.

7. Video: HDR profile for the a6400

The three cameras can record 4K video up to 30fps using the entire width of the sensor and performing full pixel readout (6K of information is used and downscaled to 4K for extra sharpness).

Sony A6000 vs Sony Alpha A6300

Dlaczego Sony A6000 jest lepszy od Sony Alpha A6300?

  • 20shots pojemniejsza bateria

Dlaczego Sony Alpha A6300 jest lepszy od Sony A6000?

  • 246 więcej czujników/punktów ostrości

Jakie są najpopularniejsze porównania?

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha a6500

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha A6300

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III

Canon EOS Rebel T6

Tańsze odpowiedniki

Sony Alpha a6500

Nikon D7500 + Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR

Nikon D600 + AF-S NIKKOR 24-85mm VR

Canon EOS 77D + Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM

Sony A6000 + Sony 16-50mm Zoom Lens

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III

Urządzenie jest chronione specjalnymi uszczelkami, które zapobiegają awariom spowodowanymi przez kurz, deszcz i rozbryzgi wody.

Sony Alpha A6300

Dzięki 100% pokryciu możesz skomponować zdjęcie odpowiednio. Z niecałkowitym pokryciem możliwe, że będziesz musiał obcinać je w późniejszym czasie aby odpowiednio wyglądały.

Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H

Ekrany typu flip-out mogą być przydatne podczas robienia skomplikowanych ujęć.

Sony Alpha A6300

Silnik ostrości ustawia obiektyw w celu automatycznego ustawienia ostrości. W przypadku aparatów systemowych posiadających silnik ostrości w korpusie pozwala na użycie szerokiego zakresu obiektywów, również takich które nie posiadają silnika ostrości. W aparatach kompaktowych, silnik ostrości jest zwykle wbudowany.

Sony Alpha A6300

Gorąca stopka daje możliwość podłączenia zewnętrznej lampy błyskowej, która daje większą siłę błysku oraz naturalniejsze zdjęcia poprzez odbicie błysku od ścian i tym podobnych.

Sony Alpha A6300

Urządzenie posiada trzy pełne sub-piksele przypadające na jeden piksel, co powoduje, że obraz jest ostry i wyraźny. Piksele w niektórych wyświetlaczach (np. AMOLED) dzielą tylko jeden subpiksel żeby zachować przestrzeń. Może to spowodować nieostry lub rozmyty obraz.

Sony Alpha A6300 vs Sony Alpha a6500

Dlaczego Sony Alpha A6300 jest lepszy od Sony Alpha a6500?

  • 0.41% więcej megapikseli (kamera główna)
    24.3MP vs 24.2MP
  • 50shots pojemniejsza bateria

Dlaczego Sony Alpha a6500 jest lepszy od Sony Alpha A6300?

  • Ma wbudowaną optyczną stablizację obrazu

Jakie są najpopularniejsze porównania?

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha a6500

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha a6500

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha a6500

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha a6500

Sony Alpha a7 III

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha a6500

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha a6500

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha a6500

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha a6500

Sony Alpha A6300

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III

Sony Alpha a6500

Tańsze odpowiedniki

Sony Alpha a6500

Nikon D600 + AF-S NIKKOR 24-85mm VR

Canon EOS 77D + Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM

Sony A6000 + Sony 16-50mm Zoom Lens

Urządzenie jest chronione specjalnymi uszczelkami, które zapobiegają awariom spowodowanymi przez kurz, deszcz i rozbryzgi wody.

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha a6500

Dzięki 100% pokryciu możesz skomponować zdjęcie odpowiednio. Z niecałkowitym pokryciem możliwe, że będziesz musiał obcinać je w późniejszym czasie aby odpowiednio wyglądały.

Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H

Ekrany typu flip-out mogą być przydatne podczas robienia skomplikowanych ujęć.

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha a6500

Silnik ostrości ustawia obiektyw w celu automatycznego ustawienia ostrości. W przypadku aparatów systemowych posiadających silnik ostrości w korpusie pozwala na użycie szerokiego zakresu obiektywów, również takich które nie posiadają silnika ostrości. W aparatach kompaktowych, silnik ostrości jest zwykle wbudowany.

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha a6500

Gorąca stopka daje możliwość podłączenia zewnętrznej lampy błyskowej, która daje większą siłę błysku oraz naturalniejsze zdjęcia poprzez odbicie błysku od ścian i tym podobnych.

Sony Alpha A6300

Sony Alpha a6500

Urządzenie posiada trzy pełne sub-piksele przypadające na jeden piksel, co powoduje, że obraz jest ostry i wyraźny. Piksele w niektórych wyświetlaczach (np. AMOLED) dzielą tylko jeden subpiksel żeby zachować przestrzeń. Może to spowodować nieostry lub rozmyty obraz.

Sony a6300 vs a6500 Camera Comparison

At first glance, both the Sony a6300 and a6500 look identical but don’t be fooled: each camera has some important distinctions. We will let you know what these differences are so that you know exactly what you’re getting for your money.

Each cameras’ major features and specifications will be compared, and we will award points whenever one model outdoes the other. At the end, we will tally up the points and let you know which camera is best and whether it is worth its price tag.

Both cameras have the same APS-C sensor. It is 366.6mm2 and 24.2 megapixels. This sensor gives users of either camera the exact same control over an image’s quality and depth of field.

The sensor also has the same ISO range of 100 – 25600. For those unaware ISO is a measurement of light sensitivity. Low settings are best for shooting in the sun while higher settings are best for indoor or night photography.

Both cameras have 425 autofocus points, which make it easy to hone in on a subject. Users can also easily track subjects as they move from point to point. Face-detection focus is included, which makes the camera ideal for taking portrait shots.

Burst Mode

When undertaking action photography, users will want to utilize burst mode. This feature allows each camera to shoot up to 11 shots per second. Users can then sort through a range of images to select the best ones.

The a6500 has an improved shutter mechanism over the a6300. It is quieter and produces less camera shake due to additional braking mechanisms and an elastic shock absorber.

+1 for the a6500

Lens Mount

Each camera incorporates the Sony E lens mount, with approximately 73 lens options available. These include standard, wide angle, SuperZoom, and macro prime lenses. There are more than enough options for whatever type of photography you plan on doing.

The most affordable way to acquire lenses is to get them included in an Amazon bundle deal. We will discuss these options in the price section.

Video Quality

Both cameras are beasts when it comes to shooting video footage. Both can record high definition (720p and 1080p) footage at 120fps. What’s even better is that they can record ultra-high (4K) video at 30fps. While 4K requires a lot of computer power to play and edit, it is a great option for those seeking near professional-level video quality.

Both cameras also allow users to record slow-motion videos.

Both cameras have 3” 922k dot resolution screens. Both screens are articulating (tilt and swivel), which means users have more flexibility when choosing shooting positions.

The main difference is that the a6500 has a touchscreen. This feature makes it much easier to operate the camera and navigate through the menus (just like a smartphone). The a6500 also has a revamped interface with offers additional improvements to menu navigation.

+1 for the a6500

Portability

The a6300 weighs slightly less at 404 grams, compared to the a6500 weight of 453 grams. The a6300 is also fractionally thinner at 120 x 67 x 49mm compared to 120 x 67 x 53mm. Therefore, the a6300 is slightly more portable than its predecessor.

+1 for the a6300

Battery Life

The a6300 can take 400 shots on a single charge while the a6500 can only 350 shots. There is a noticeable difference of 50 shots.

+1 for the a6300

Image Stabilization

Low shutter speeds can cause camera shake, which is why image stabilization is a handy feature for a camera to possess. Now, only the a6500 incorporates a 5-axis image-stabilization gyro, which helps reduce any distortion caused by motion. Users can safely take photos at low shutter speeds with similar camera shake.

The a6500’s image stabilization technology is compatible with most Sony E mount lenses.

The a6300 does not incorporate any form of image stabilization technology.

+1 for the a6500

The a6500 has built-in Bluetooth for on-the-go connectivity. Unfortunately, the a6300 misses out on this feature.

+1 for the a6500

Further Common Strengths

Both cameras have many more strengths in common.

  • Both cameras have a focus peaking function that highlights objects in focus.
  • Both cameras can take panoramic shots.
  • Both cameras have built-in WIFI.
  • Both cameras have an internal flash.
  • Both cameras have an external microphone jack for improved sound quality when shooting
  • Both cameras incorporate HDMI-out so that users can view images on an external screen.
  • Both cameras incorporate bulb shutter for extra-long exposures.

Further Common Weakness

Both cameras also have a few common weaknesses

  • Neither camera has a headphone jack.
  • Neither camera has built-in GPS.
  • Each camera only has a single SD card slot.

The a6300 costs around $1,000 on Amazon. This price is for a new camera with a single lens. A bundle deal with multiple lenses, a tripod, an SD card, and other accessories costs around $1,250.

A new a6500 costs approximately $1,400 on Amazon. To get a bundle deal with multiple lenses, an SD card, and other accessories, you should expect to pay around $1,870 on Amazon.

It’s clear that the a6300 is the more affordable option.

+1 for the a6300

Total Scores

We have tallied up the scores below, and you can see that it’s pretty close. Both cameras have far more in common than they do apart.

  • Image Stabilization
  • Screen
  • Bluetooth
  • Shutter

You can use the chart below to compare each device easily.

Sony a6300 Sony a6500
Photography:
Megapixels 24.2 24.2
ISO Range 100 – 25600 100 – 25600
Sensor Size 366.6mm2 366.6mm2
AF Points 425 425
Burst Mode 11fps 11fps
Focus Peaking Yes Yes
Panoramic Shots Yes Yes
Lens Mount Sony E Sony E
Built-in Flash Yes Yes
Video:
Max Frame Rate 30fps in 4K mode

120fps in 720p and 1080p mode

30fps in 4K mode

120fps in 720p and 1080p mode

Slow Motion Video Yes Yes
Microphone Jack Yes Yes
Headphone Jack No No
Build:
Weight 404 grams 453 grams
Dimensions 120 x 67 x 49mm 120 x 67 x 53mm
Screen:
Size 3” 3”
Articulating Yes Yes
Touchscreen No Yes
Resolution 922k dots 922k dots
Other Features:
Wi-Fi Yes Yes
HDMI Out Yes Yes
Blub Shutter Yes Yes
Image Stabilization No Yes
Bluetooth No Yes
GPS No No
Dual SD Card Slots No No
Approximate Amazon Price:
Standalone $1,000 $1,400
Bundle Deal $1,250 $1,870

What are the Main Differences and which Camera Should You Get?

The main differences between the two models are that the a6500 incorporates Bluetooth, a touchscreen, an improved shutter mechanism, and image stabilization while the a6300 misses out on these features. However, the a6300 does have longer battery life and is fractionally smaller and lighter.

The a6500 is the better camera but is it worth the greater price tag? For photographers that must have image stabilization, for shooting at low shutter speeds, then it may just be worth it. However, the typical photographer is probably better off saving some cash and getting the a6300. It is still an exceptionally powerful camera for taking both still-shots and recording ultra-high definition video. You will miss out on Bluetooth and a touchscreen, but neither of these features are crucial anyway.

If you like, simply spend the savings on extra lenses for the a6300 (or just leave the money in your bank account).

Sony Alpha A6400 vs A6500: Which should you buy?

The Sony Alpha A6500 may sound like a newer camera than the A6400, but that’s just Sony trying to confuse you with its slightly baffling naming system.

While the A6500 was released in 2016, the Sony A6400 is a brand new mid-range CSC and a replacement for the A6300 (at least that bit makes sense).

So who are these cameras for? They’re really happy middle ground for anyone who’s looking to make an affordable leap from bulkier DSLRs, or those wanting to step up from smartphones or compacts.

The A6500 is part of a higher-end line. But the prices of the two are not that different, particularly if there’s a cashback promo live as you look. So which should you buy?

Let’s dig into these camera’s capabilities to see the differences.

Sony A6400 vs A6500 — Design and screen

The Sony Alpha A6400 and A6500 look very similar. Their dimensions are almost identical, 120mm wide and 67mm tall. The A6400 is slightly thicker, but this is likely down to the new display style.

Here you get a flip-up display that lets you check the view when you hold the camera up, pointing at yourself. Fans of traditional shooting may sigh at the idea of a camera as capable as this being reduced to a selfie machine. But that’s just one use. It also makes the Sony Alpha A6400 a potential roving vlogging machine.

For some, creating video isn’t just a hobby, it’s a business. The Alpha A6500 has a hinged screen too. But instead of flipping up to the ‘selfie’ position, it can simply be angled up and down, to make shooting above and below your eye level easier. It can’t flip the whole way round to face the direction of the lens, though, making it less suitable for vlogging.

One of the Sony A6400’s big upgrades is a screen that flip upwards a full 180 degrees, which is ideal for vlogging.

Both cameras use a mix of plastic and magnesium alloy parts, and have very similar control layouts. The A6500 has two ‘custom’ buttons on the top plate, the A6400 just the one, but both cameras are made to be happy shooting fully auto or full/partial manual.

The two cameras also have a 0.39-inch OLED viewfinder of 2.59-million pixel resolution (1024 x 768) and 1.07x magnification. Your view of the scene through them should be near-enough identical.

Sony A6400 vs A6500 — Autofocus

Autofocus is the other main area where the Sony A6400 benefits from being the newer camera. Sony offers some of the best AF performance among mirrorless cameras, and it claims this new system is the “world’s fastest”.

The more specific claim is that it achieves focus in 0.02 seconds, up from 0.05 seconds in the A6500. As ever, this will of course vary, depending on available light and other factors.

It does sound an impressive system, though. 425 points that cover 84 percent of the frame can use either phase detection or contrast detection. Raw hardware alone doesn’t cover the progress entirely, though. The A6400 has 425 phase detection points too.

The A6400’s autofocus promises to be speedier at locking onto subjects and tracking them, though we’ll have to see if this bears out in our tests.

However, Sony has also improved its object-tracking algorithms and added eye-based tracking, for a more precise lock on what is, usually, the most important area of a face to keep looking sharp.

AF tracking of people should also be more reliable thanks to this extra intelligence.

Sony A6400 vs A6500 —Image quality and performance

Both the Alpha A6400 and A6400 are APS-C cameras with 24.2 megapixel resolution sensors. However, Sony has altered the ISO range a little in the newer A6400.

Its native ISO range is 100-32,000, and this can be expanded to 102,400 if you need to deal with a seriously dark scene. The A6400 has a slightly lower ISO cap. Its ISO range is 100-25,600, and can be expanded to 51,200.

The cameras both have a Bionz X processor but Sony claims the A6400’s sensor is new, which may explain the choice to alter the ISO range. A willingness to push the range a little further may be down to altered noise reduction algorithms too.

Burst modes speeds haven’t changed, mind. The Sony A6400 and A6400 both shoot at up to 11fps, with 8fps, 6fps and 3fps speeds on offer when you need to burst shoot over a longer period.

Unlike the A6500, the A6400 lacks in-built image stabilisation, which is a downside for both stills and video. Although some Sony lenses do have built-in IS.

A quick glance may see you conclude the A6400 is a slight technical upgrade. However, we’d still pick the A6500 to shoot stills, any day.

It has a much larger burst buffer, and can capture 233 max quality JPEGs (107 RAW) before needing to offload onto the memory card. The A6400 will slow down after 99 frames (46 RAW).

IBIS is the real stinger, though. The Sony Alpha A6500 has 5-axis in-body stabilisation, letting you shoot at much slower shutter speeds handheld without blur. The A6400 does not.

IBIS helps not just with eliminating handshake blur in your photos, but also composing images, particularly if you use a zoom lens. The subject will look less wobbly.

Of course, some Sony lenses have their own stabilisation, but not all.

Sony A6400 vs A6500 — Video

The Sony A6400 is clearly marketed at those engaged with social media, and people looking to dabble in YouTube and other video platforms. However, there aren’t actually any core video skills above those of the two-year-old A6500.

Both can shoot at up to 4K resolution, 30 frames per second. You can shoot 1080p at up to 120fps, and of course both 30fps and 60fps 1080p modes are on hand for “normal” shooting.

Sony’s XAVC S codec allows 100M capture and both camera have a 3.5mm mic input plus “flat” shooting modes to let you grade your own colour for professional-looking results.

Each has its own special feature, though. The Alpha 6500’s IBIS helps out in stabilising footage, and Sony has improved video stabilisation with a software update since we reviewed the camera last year. The A6400’s flip up screen lets you check your video composition while vlogging, but it does not have IBIS.

The A6400 perhaps edges it as a vlogging tool thanks to that flip-up screen, though its lack of IBIS or a headphone jack means it’s far from perfect too.

Neither camera has a headphone jack for audio monitoring during capture, which is a shame. There’s another point to consider. If you plug your mic into the hotshoe on the A6400’s top plate, are you going to block the display anyway?

This difference can make the Sony Alpha A6400 seem fluffy next to the A6500. But let’s get real. The way to get ultra-smooth footage handheld is with a motorised gimbal not sensor stabilisation, which is usually only designed to counteract minor motion. Such systems were generally devised primarily for stills rather than video.

For some of you, this choice should boil down to the practicalities of cost. Would the difference in price let you buy a decent gimbal like the Zhiyun Crane or FeiyuTech A1000? If you shoot a lot of video, having one of these will upgrade your results more than any switch between these two.

Early verdict

If you’re mainly a stills shooter, the Sony A6500 is clearly the better, or at least more versatile, of these two cameras. IBIS lets you shoot handheld with any lens, at fairly slow shutter speeds. A much larger burst buffer means it’s better a “sports” style photography too.

But that’s not what the newer Sony A6400 is about. If you’re after a camera to take images for your social accounts, the full tilt screen makes it a selfie pro. And its core video capture stats match the A6500’s. Make sure you use a stabilised lens for video unless you’ll mount the camera on a tripod or flat surface.

Its only victory on the stills side is the new AF system, which sounds mighty impressive, particularly for face tracking. However, the Alpha A6500 is probably more “complete” of the two cameras, and only falls behind in AF because it’s older.

That said, we’ll update this feature when we’ve fully reviewed the Sony A6400 and discovered exactly how much of an upgrade those AF features are.

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Sony A6600 vs Sony A6500: Should you upgrade?

Sony’s APS-C range of cameras may not have been grabbing the headlines to the degree of its full-frame offerings, but it’s the former models that the majority of consumers actually buy – and a new flagship camera has been announced in the form of the Sony A6600.

In true Sony style, it hasn’t actually been that long since the previous flagship was unveiled, so it’s worth comparing the two side by side to see which is worthy of your investment.

As you might expect, the newer model comes at a price premium. It isn’t too extreme, though: at the time of writing, the A6600 will likely set you back approx £300 more than the A6500.

Still, that £300 isn’t an insignificant sum; it’s money that you could be putting towards a lens, another accessory, or even a trip away. So is it worth splashing out? Both models feature a 24.2-megapixel APS-C sensor paired with a Bionz X processor, which suggests image quality should be similar. Let’s look at the key differences.

Sony A6600 vs A6500 – Design and screen

Here’s where Sony has made a couple of small but important tweaks. The result is that shooting with the A6600 is a far nicer experience than its predecessor. There’s now an improved grip, which is 6.5mm deeper and is 15% bigger overall – you may still find that your little finger dangles precariously off the bottom edge of the camera if your hands are on the large size, but it’s certainly a more comfortable experience. Sony also claims that the grip’s material has been “upgraded” for a “more rigid feel”.

Being able to customise how different buttons and dials work has always been a focus for Sony, and for the A6600 the company has added an additional custom button for extra control. Both the A6600 and A6500 are dust- and moisture-resistant, which should make them fully able to withstand a rain shower or two while out shooting landscapes or seascapes.

The built-in viewfinder remains the same for the A6600 as the A6500, being 0.39in in size and 2359k-dots. It isn’t as large or as high resolution as those you’ll find on the A9 or A7 full-frame cameras, but it’s perfectly usable.

Meanwhile, the screens too are similar at 3in in size and 921,600 dots. However, the A6600’s screen can tilt to face all the way forwards for shooting selfies and videos; vloggers, in particular, will welcome this update.

Sony A6600 vs A6500 – Autofocus

Sony has made huge strides in autofocus performance, even for its more affordable APS-C models.

The A6500 was certainly no slouch, packing a Fast Hybrid AF system with 425 phase-detection autofocus points coupled with 169 contrast-detect AF points for both fast and accurate focusing. It also featured Eye AF and Tracking AF.

Building on that excellent performance, the A6600 features 425 phase-detection points as well as 425 contrast-detect points. This means that almost the entire frame is covered by points. “Real-time” autofocus tracking has also been included. It uses artificial intelligence to switch to the most appropriate type of tracking for the subject, while real-time Eye AF also incorporates Animal Eye AF for enhanced pet portraits.

If you’re the kind of photographer who likes to shoot mainly static subjects – such as landscapes – then the improvements made here are unlikely to be hugely impactful. For somebody who shoots action and sports, however, it could be worth the extra investment.

Sony A6600 vs A6500 – Image quality and performance

In terms of image quality, the difference between the A6500 and the A6600 should be pretty minimal.

Both use a 24.2-megapixel APS-C sensor paired with a Bionz X processor, offering 5-axis image stabilisation. With improved autofocus tracking, it should be easier to capture some subjects – but, otherwise, image quality should be near-identical. A more precise comparison will be possible once full production samples of the A6600 become available.

A significant improvement comes in the form of battery life. The A6600 includes the new “Z” battery, which promises the best battery life of any Sony mirrorless camera – including the full-frame models. The Z battery has a CIPA rating of 810 shots, although you should be able to achieve better performance with good power management practices. Nevertheless, that 810 shots is super-impressive performance indeed. By contrast, the Aa6500 has a more modest 310-shot life.

Sony A6600 vs A6500 – Video

Both the A6500 and A6600 feature 4K video recording. You should therefore find that in terms of output, both models are roughly equal.

However, there have been some key improvements made to how you actually capture that footage. For a start, real-time AF is also now available in video recording, as well as in stills capture.

Furthermore, as well as a microphone socket, there’s now also a headphone jack for monitoring audio. The screen tilting all the way forward will be appreciated by vloggers and those who record pieces to camera.

Sony A6600 vs A6500 – Early verdict

There’s plenty to like about both the A6500 and the A6600. Sony claims that more than 40 improvements have been made between the two models. While some of those are significant, others are minor.

At the time of writing, the A6600 retails for around £1449 (body only), making it around £300 more expensive than the A6500. Whether you choose to splash the extra cash will largely depend on the kind of photographer you are.

The biggest improvements come in the shape of autofocus tracking, which could prove useful for action and sports photography. If you’re someone whose subjects are usually still – landscapes, portraits or still life, for example – then you’ll be better served by the cheaper A6500.

It’s the A6600’s improved 810-shot battery life that really makes it worthy of consideration over the A6500. If you’re a travel photographer worried about short battery life, then this could make the A6600 worth the extra money.

Overall, the older A6500 remains a competent and capable camera that’s still well worth considering if you’re looking for a high-end compact system camera. Investing the extra cash in the newest model is worth it for several reasons, but it’s particularly appealing for action photographers. We’ll take a look in greater detail at how the A6600 stacks in due course.

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Sony A6500 — błędy przeszłości naprawione

W niecały rok po premierze modelu A6300 Sony prezentuje jego następcę, który jest w zasadzie tym, czym A6300 powinien być od początku. Otrzymujemy między innymi stabilizację obrazu, dotykowy ekran i większą wydajność.

  • Specjalne układy LSI znacznie usprawnić mają przetwarzanie obrazu — lepszy obraz na wysokich czułościach i pojemniejszy bufor (307 zdjęć)
  • Dotykowy ekran ułatwi ustawianie ostrości (także podczas korzystania z wizjera)
  • Nowy mechanizm migawki wytrzymać ma 200 tys. cykli
  • Dwa nowe tryby pomiaru światła ułatwią odpowiednie ustawienie ekspozycji
  • W pełni magnezowy korpus
  • Cena: 1700 euro

Zaprezentowany w lutym model A6300 podczas premiery wywołał falę entuzjazmu, jednak już bliższe spojrzenie na aparat sprawiało, że czar pryskał. Mimo imponującego autofokusa i możliwości filmowania w jakości 4K, aparat był dość wolny, a przy tym niepozbawiony wad. Pewnie dlatego Sony tak szybko zdecydowało się wypuścić kolejny model, który wreszcie wydaje się być godnym następcą dobrze ocenianego modelu A6000.

Z zewnątrz, nowy Sony A6500 od swojego poprzednika nie różni się właściwie niczym. Korpus jest jednak tym razem w całości wykonany z magnezu, a producent twierdzi, że poprawiono także grip i muszlę oczną wizjera. Największe zmiany dotyczą jednak wnętrza aparatu. Na tym froncie widzimy usprawnienia, których wyraźnie zabrakło w modelu A6300.

Otrzymujemy tę samą 24,2-milionową matrycę APS-C CMOS, wspomaganą procesorem BIONZ X, która pozwoli nam na fotografowanie w zakresie ISO 100-51200. Na pokładzie znalazły się jednak nowoopracowane układy scalone dużej skali integracji (LSI), które znacznie zwiększać mają możliwości przetwarzania obrazu, oferując lepszej jakości obraz na niskich czułościach i windując osiągi trybu seryjnego.

Serią, z pełnym wsparciu autofokusa będziemy mogli fotografować z maksymalną prędkością 11 kl./s (8 kl./s w trybie Live View), a bufor pozwoli nam pomieścić do 307 zdjęć. Na razie nie wiadomo czy chodzi o pliki w formacie JPEG czy RAW.

Otrzymujemy także znany z pełnoklatkowej serii A system 5-osiowej stabilizacji matrycy, który według producenta może pochwalić się skutecznością rzędu 5 EV. Nareszcie tez projektanci Sony zdecydowali się wyposażyć bezlusterkowca w ekran dotykowy. Ten oczywiście może być wykorzystywany do łatwiejszego ostrzenia -podobnie jak aparatach Olympusa i Panasonica będziemy mogli dotykowo sterować punktem ostrości także podczas spoglądania przez wizjer.

Podobnie jak w przypadku poprzednika prezentuje się tryb filmowy. Maksymalna oferowana rozdzielczość to nadal 4K (3840 x 2160 pikseli) i nic chyba nie zmieniło się pod względem współczynnika crop podczas filmowania w tej rozdzielczości. Obraz próbkowany ma być z obszaru o rozmiarach 6K i skalowany do wyjściowej rozdzielczości 4K. Miejmy tylko nadzieję, że nowe układy LSI sprawią iż pod względem efektu rolling shutter będzie lepiej niż w modelu A6300.

Obraz zapisywany ma być z przepływnością 100 Mbps w formacie XAVC S, z prędkością 30 kl./s. W trybie Full HD klatkaż będziemy mogli teraz jednak swobodnie zwiększyć aż do 100 kl./s, co z pewnością zadowoli fanów filmów w zwolnionym tempie. Standardowo już otrzymamy profile Log oraz wejście mikrofonowe. Szkoda, że nadal nie otrzymujemy wyjścia słuchawkowego. Nowością ma być znana nam z aparatów innych producentów możliwość wyciągania z filmu pojedynczych 8-megapikselowych klatek.

Na pokładzie znalazł się także nowy mechanizm migawki, którego żywotność oceniono na 200 tys. cykli. Poprawiono także interfejs aparatu, który prawdopodobnie będzie przypominać ten z zaprezentowanego ostatnio modelu A99 II. Niewygodne menu było rzeczą notorycznie wypominaną przez nas w testach aparatów Sony. Miejmy nadzieję, że nie są to tylko zmiany kosmetyczne.

Ponadto aparat oferuje dwa nowy tryby pomiaru światła: Highlight (priorytet jasnych partii obrazu) oraz Entire Screen Avg, który doskonale równoważyć ma ekspozycję całego kadru.

Reszta specyfikacji nie odbiega od tego co oferował model A3000. Otrzymujemy więc między innymi 425-punktowy hybrydowy autofokus w technologii 4D Focus, wizjer elektroniczny XGA OLED Tru-Finder o rozdzielczości 2,4 Mp oraz funkcje bezprzewodowe.

Aparat trafi na rynek w grudniu, w cenie 1700 euro za samo body. Polskiej ceny na razie nie znamy.

Sony A6500 vs Sony A6400

  • Go in depth with our full Sony A6500 Review.
  • How does it shoot? Sony A6500 in the real world.
  • See real-world photos taken with the A6500.
  • Compare Sony A6500 image quality against competitors .
  • What’s the bottom line? Read our Sony A6500 conclusion.
  • Go in depth with our full Sony A6400 Review.
  • How does it shoot? Sony A6400 in the real world.
  • See real-world photos taken with the A6400.

Differences

Sony A6500 advantages over Sony A6400

Sony A6400 advantages over Sony A6500

Similarities

Common Strengths

Common Weaknesses

User reviews

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Review Excerpt

Comfortable, premium body with good controls; Touch-screen for subject selection; Hybrid image stabilization system; Excellent image quality; Better high ISO JPEGs than the A6300; Extremely fast 11.1 fps burst capture; Very deep buffers for raw and JPEG alike; 4K video capture with no pixel binning

Pricey for an APS-C camera; JPEG colors aren’t the most accurate; Very slow buffer clearing; Laggy touch-pad AF function; Poorly-placed movie button; No headphone jack; Mediocre battery life

Portrait Photographers Miami l Celebrity Portrait Photography Florida’s

Sony a6000, a6300 & a6500 Showdown: Which Camera Suits You Best?

With the flagship a6500 scheduled to begin shipping early December, the Sony a6000 Series hits three. Which Sony a6000 Series mirrorless camera suits you best?

Sony a6000, a6300 & a6500 all offer 24MP sensors capable of 11 Frames per Second continuous shooting in a compact, lightweight mirrorless body. But they offer three distinctly different levels of features and price points. Here’s a look at how they compare to help answer which camera is best for you.

TALE OF THE TAPE

ROUND-BY-ROUND

Round 1: Image Sensor

WINNER: Sony a6300/a6500. While all three cameras feature 24 MP Exmor CMOS image sensors, Sony a6300 & a6500 have an improved sensor that features a thin copper-wiring layer and large photodiode substrate designed for light collection efficiency resulting in less noise at High ISOs.

Round 2: Image Stabilization

WINNER: Sony a6500. The only a6000-Series model featuring 5-Axis Image Stabilization using an all-new mechanism designed specifically for Sony APS-C mirrorless sensors. You’ll get 5-axis IS with native E-mount lenses (and 8-pin Sony A-mount glass on LA-EA adapters) and 3-Axis Image stabilization with any other lenses – including lenses that were never stabilized before.

Round 3: Auto-Focus Points

WINNER: Sony a6300/a6500. Featuring 425 Phase-Detection + 169 Contrast Detection AF points (compared to 179 Phase-Detection + 25 Contrast Detection AF points on a6000) for extremely wide and dense AF point coverage throughout the frame. High-density Tracking AF Technology seamlessly activates AF points to track subjects moving within frame with precision.

Round 4: Processing Power & Buffer Size

WINNER: Sony a6500. With the most in-class processing horsepower, a6500 adds a a new LSI Processor & much larger buffer to allow for long bursts of up to 107 RAW images (or 233 JPG Extra Fine) at 11 FPS. Think of it as the a6000 Series with a Hemi-engine.

Round 5: Autofocus Speed

WINNER: Sony a6300/a6500. At a blazing fast 0.05 seconds, both the a6300 and a6500 feature the World’s Fastest Autofocus!

Round 6: Third-Party Autofocus Performance

WINNER: Sony a6300/a6500. If you’re planning to use Canon, Nikon or Sony A-mount lenses, go with a6300 or a6500 since they enable Phase-Detection AF with 3rd-party lenses on Smart Adapters.

Round 7: Touch Focus

WINNER: Sony a6500. Only Sony a6500 has touch focus. Sony a6000 and a6300 do not. If touch Focus is important to you, a6500 is your champ.

Round 8: Video Resolution

WINNER: Sony a6300/a6500. Feature full pixel readout without pixel binning for 2.4x oversampled 4K movie resolution from the full width of the sensor. Sony a6000 shoots 1080 HD video.

Round 9: Silent Shooting

WINNER: Sony a6300/a6500. Sony a6300 and a6500 have Silent Shooting Mode. Sony a6000 does not. Bear in mind that the standard Electronic-Front Shutter is extremely quiet – but only Silent Shooting mode is totally silent…

Round 10: Expected Shutter Life

WINNER: a6500. The Sony a6500 shutter is rated at 200,000 shots – double the expected shutter life of a6000 and a6300, according to Sony. [PLEASE NOTE: This is just an estimate. I’ve greatly exceeded the expected shutter life of many Sony cameras.]

Round 11: Weight & Size

WINNER: Sony a6000. Weighing in at just 12.13 oz with battery and memory card, Sony a6000 is the lightest of the a6000-Series bodies. The added weight of a6500 comes from the 5-Axis Image Stabilization mechanism. Grip size also grows from 1.8″ on a6000 to 2.1″ on a6500. In this instance, I’d argue BIGGER IS BETTER!

Round 12: Price

WINNER: Sony a6000. If price is your bottom line, Sony a6000 weighs in at five bills and change. This makes it the lowest-priced contender in the Sony a6000 Series line-up.

AND THE WINNER IS…

Sony a6000, a6300 & a6500 are all great cameras. Pick the camera with the features – or price – that’s best for you!

Sony A6500 vs Sony A6600

  • Go in depth with our full Sony A6500 Review.
  • How does it shoot? Sony A6500 in the real world.
  • See real-world photos taken with the A6500.
  • Compare Sony A6500 image quality against competitors .
  • What’s the bottom line? Read our Sony A6500 conclusion.
  • Go in depth with our full Sony A6600 Review.
  • See real-world photos taken with the A6600.

Differences

Sony A6500 advantages over Sony A6600

Sony A6600 advantages over Sony A6500

Longer stills battery life

Cameras with longer battery life can take more photos before exhausting their batteries.

Special note: The measurement standard for battery life stipulates that if a camera has an internal flash, it must be used for 50% of photos taken. For this reason, comparisons of one camera with an internal flash to another without will not be comparable

Similarities

Common Strengths

Common Weaknesses

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Review Excerpt

Comfortable, premium body with good controls; Touch-screen for subject selection; Hybrid image stabilization system; Excellent image quality; Better high ISO JPEGs than the A6300; Extremely fast 11.1 fps burst capture; Very deep buffers for raw and JPEG alike; 4K video capture with no pixel binning

Pricey for an APS-C camera; JPEG colors aren’t the most accurate; Very slow buffer clearing; Laggy touch-pad AF function; Poorly-placed movie button; No headphone jack; Mediocre battery life

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